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English



About the Program

Welcome to Foothill College’s Department of English, one of the largest, most diverse, and vibrant departments on campus, online, and in Silicon Valley. Our faculty are engaged in some of the most dynamic areas of literary studies, creative writing, and rhetoric and composition. Alongside our students, we read, write, and think critically about a variety of local, regional, national, and global texts and contexts. Through carefully designed courses of study, students are invited to engage with texts that reflect a range of cultural perspectives.

The English Department empowers students by facilitating their understanding and use of language and other media as we support their academic, career-related, and personal endeavors.

Our chief want is someone who will inspire us to be who we know we could be. Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

What you can do with a degree in English

  • Writing & Editing
  • Communications
  • Education
  • Content Strategy & Development
  • Law
  • Journalism
  • Nonprofits
  • Business Development
  • And so much more!

Why Study English?

The English Major prepares students for a range of careers and disciplines. An English degree enhances students' critical reading, writing, and thinking skills and offers a breadth of cultural and historical knowledge through the study and creation of diverse texts.

 

Degree & Program Types

Foothill College offers two English degrees, the Associate in Arts (AA) and the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT). The ADT prepares students for transfer to four-year institutions. Students who complete the ADT in English are ensured preferential transfer status to any California State University (CSU) as an English major.

Check out this list for a quick view of our English programs. For program requirements and full course listings, view degrees and certificates information.

Associate in Arts Degree

Associate Degree for Transfer

Courses

Most of the English Department's literature courses are offered only once per year or every other year.

Please check current schedule of classes for days and times and any changes or cancellations.

Check out our literature courses being offered in Fall 2019. See the English course catalog for a full listing with descriptions and links to currently offered classes.

ENGL 5: LGBT Literature


 

Intro to the history and development of LGBT literature as a both mainstream and distinct literary traditions and genres. Readings represent a variety of historical periods and contrasting societal attitudes toward same-sex relationships and queer gender identities, ranging from ancient Greek and Roman texts to contemporary American poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fiction prose. Emphasis on the emergence of contemporary LGBT literatures and identities in the United States in the twentieth century within the broader context of on-going class, race, gender, religious, political, and aesthetic debates.This course is offered online. 

ENGL 17: Introduction to Shakespeare

 

Intro to selected plays and sonnets of Shakespeare. Focus on detailed analysis of representative tragic, comedic, romance, history plays, and sonnets of Shakespeare.  Includes critical theory and secondary source research. Intended as an introductory course for English majors and students across the curriculum. This course is offered online.

ENGL 22: Women Writers

An examination of the works of multicultural women poets, novelists, dramatists, and essayists and their aesthetic and sociopolitical contribution to English and American literature. Literary discussions of gender as relevant to race, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, sexual orientation, and other constructs of identity and power. This course is offered online.

ENGL 24: Unmasking Comics: The Dawn of the Graphic Novel

 Introduction to the history of graphic communication, emphasizing the burgeoning and dynamic form of contemporary graphic narrative: from memoir writing, to crime fiction, to the superhero, to socio-political writing. Explore how the history and evolution of this distinct literary genre has made it a relevant form of expression for artists and writers across the world and how reading comics challenges traditional modes of reading. Because this form of storytelling is used by artists all over the world to express the human condition and specific socio-cultural insight, the course inspires world-wide cross-cultural awareness. This course is offered online.

 

ENGL 43A: Survey of British Literature I: Beowulf to the Late 18C


 A survey of canonical literature spanning the earliest Old English texts, Middle English period, Early Modern period, ending with Neoclassicism. Texts discussed and analyzed within historical, sociocultural, philosophical, and aesthetic contexts. This course is offered online.

 

ENGL 43A: Survey of British Literature I: Beowulf to the Late 18C, Honors

 

 A survey of canonical literature spanning the earliest Old English texts, Middle English period, Early Modern period, ending with Neoclassicism. Texts discussed and analyzed within historical, sociocultural, philosophical, and aesthetic contexts. Specific to this honors course: A higher level of sophisticated scholarship through extensive research and literature review, critical essays, and opportunities for scholarly presentation, student-generated discussions, and self-directed projects. Rigorous application and analysis of theoretical paradigms as applied across these contexts in analysis of canonical literary texts. This course is offered online.

ENGL45B Survey of American Literature II: 1865-Present

Introduces students to multicultural American Literature from the end of the Civil War in 1865 to the present, focusing on the evolution of literary traditions, genres, cultural voices, and ecological landscapes within historical, philosophical, social, political, and aesthetic contexts. Special emphasis on the role of diverse writers in redefining the nature of American literature from the late nineteenth century through the 21st century, and thereby reshaping American national identity as the United States becomes a global superpower. This course is offered online.

ENGL 45B: Survey of American Literature, II: 1865-Present, Honors

Introduces students to multicultural American Literature from the end of the Civil War in 1865 to the present, focusing on the evolution of literary traditions, genres, cultural voices, and ecological landscapes within historical, philosophical, social, political, and aesthetic contexts. Special emphasis on the role of diverse writers in redefining the nature of American literature from the late nineteenth century through the 21st century, and thereby reshaping American national identity as the United States becomes a global superpower. Specific to this honors course: A higher level of sophisticated scholarship through extensive research and literature review, critical essays, and opportunities for scholarly presentation, student-generated discussions, and self-directed projects. Rigorous application and analysis of theoretical paradigms as applied across these contexts in analysis of canonical literary texts. This course is offered online.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Take a Creative Writing Course

 

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Questions?
Please Contact Me!

Amber La Piana, English, Department Chair

lapianaamber@fhda.edu


Division Office Contacts

LANGUAGE ARTS DIVISION
Valerie Fong, Acting Division Dean
Phone: 650.949.7227
Email: fongvalerie@@foothill.edu
To meet with the dean, contact the Student & Faculty Support Center.
Language Arts Division

 

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