Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines

Business and Social Sciences Division
CHLD 89CURRICULUM FOR EARLY CARE & EDUCATION PROGRAMSSummer 2014
4 hours lecture.4 Units

Total Quarter Learning Hours: 48 (Total of All Lecture, Lecture/Lab, and Lab hours X 12)
 
 Lecture Hours: 4 Lab Hours: Lecture/Lab:
 Note: If Lab hours are specified, see item 10. Lab Content below.

Repeatability -
Statement: Not Repeatable.

Status -
 Course Status: ActiveGrading: Letter Grade with P/NP option
 Degree Status: ApplicableCredit Status: Credit
 Degree or Certificate Requirement: AA Degree,   Certificate of Achievement
 GE Status: Non-GE

Articulation Office Information -
 Transferability: CSUValidation: 11/12;10/22/13;11/16/13

1. Description -
An overview of knowledge and skills related to providing appropriate curriculum and environments for infants and young children. Students will examine the teacher's role in supporting development by using observation and assessment strategies and emphasizing the essential role of play. An overview of content areas will include but not be limited to: language and literacy, social and emotional learning, sensory learning, art and creativity, math and science.
Prerequisite: None
Co-requisite: None
Advisory: CHLD 1 or 2.

2. Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. Identify theoretical and program model implications for curriculum
  2. Explain the relationship between a quality learning environment including curriculum and developmentally appropriate practice.
  3. Demonstrate key ways in which the environment functions as an essential component of curriculum for children ages birth to six years
  4. Formulate and evaluate curriculum plans with regard to theory and program model foundations and which affirm and respect culture, language, ethnicity, ability, economic class and gender diversity.
  5. Define and explain constructivist theory in curriculum planning for young children.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of observation, assessment, curriculum planning, implementation, documentation cycle and use it to plan, implements, and evaluate sample ECE activities.
  7. Identify the role of curriculum in supporting socialization, self-regulation and self-help skills for all children.
  8. Identify and explain the importance of planning tools and routines in early care and education programs
  9. Recognize developmentally appropriate principles and teaching strategies and apply them in supervised settings with young children.
  10. Demonstrate an understanding of the many aspects of the teacher's role in early childhood programs.
  11. Recognize variations in individual child needs and strategies to accommodate those needs.
3. Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
Classroom with sink, movable chairs, and tables.

4. Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
  1. Identify theoretical and program model implications for curriculum
    1. Theoretical implications for curriculum and latest research:
    2. Program models (ie.. Reggio, Montessori, High Scope, Creative Curriculum, Bank Street, etc.)
    3. Love of learning and trust as the first steps in development of lifelong learning skill
    4. Play based curriculum model the essence of young children and their vehicle for learning about their world
  2. Explain the relationship between a quality learning environment including curriculum and developmentally appropriate practice.
    1. Discussion of principles of developmentally appropriate practices
    2. Identifying developmentally appropriate practice for children of different age levels
  3. Demonstrate key ways in which the environment functions as an essential component of curriculum for children ages birth to six years
    1. Address the elements of the quality learning environment:
      1. The physical design, selection of safe and appropriate activities and equipment
      2. Quality standards and indicators
      3. The temporal aspects of the program
      4. Arrangement of indoor-outdoor space
      5. Safe and appropriate equipment and materials
    2. The interpersonal dynamics between teacher, children and parents
    3. Understanding that environment must be inclusive of all children
    4. The environment as teacher
      1. Balance between naturalistic and structured spaces
      2. Soft and hard space
      3. Traffic patterns
      4. Protected and open space
      5. Visual/aesthetic messages
      6. Effect on behavior
  4. Formulate and evaluate curriculum plans with regard to theory and program model foundations and which affirm and respect culture, language, ethnicity, ability, economic class and gender diversity.
    1. Assess curriculum for access that is appropriate for all children
    2. Curriculum planning that reflects the sequence of a child's ability to construct and represent her/his world
    3. Impact of language and culture on children's play and learning
    4. Best practices which may include, emergent curriculum, webbed curriculum, themes, or project approaches
    5. Importance of routines and transitions on classroom dynamics
  5. Define and explain constructivist theory in curriculum planning for young children.
    1. Children as sensory learner
    2. Choices of activities/materials
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of observation, assessment, curriculum planning,implementation, documentation cycle and use it to plan, implements, and evaluate sample ECE activities.
    1. Observation and documentation of children as it relates to curriculum planning
    2. Compare and contrast curriculum planning methods and implementation of curriculum
    3. Document curriculum planning process with written curriculum plan and reflection
    4. Curriculum cycle: observation, assessment, curriculum planning, documentation and evaluation
  7. Identify the role of curriculum in supporting socialization, self-regulation and self-help skills for all children.
    1. Supporting children's interests though emergent curriculum
    2. The role of the teacher in fostering social attitudes, values and skills
    3. Social/emotional learning environment with emphasis on children's learning and engagement
  8. Identify and explain the importance of planning tools and routines in early care and education programs
    1. Routines and curriculum for Infants and Toddlers
    2. Transitions and daily schedules
  9. Recognize developmentally appropriate principles and teaching strategies and apply them in supervised settings with young children.
    1. Review of developmental characteristics of children ranging birth to six years
    2. Responsive and intentional teaching
    3. Learning styles
    4. Effective use of learning centers and integrated curriculum throughout environment
    5. Components of learning environment
    6. Curriculum content areas included but not limited to: math, science, literacy, social studies, and creative arts.
    7. Development of the whole child (physical, social, emotional, and cognitive)
    8. Infant and Toddler use of materials and environments
  10. Demonstrate an understanding of the many aspects of the teacher's role in early childhood programs.
    1. Current research on teaching strategies and practices
    2. Innovative and best teaching practices
    3. Strategies for development of partnership to included families and staff to support children's learning
    4. Communication strategies with children and adults
    5. State preschool foundations and accreditation standards
    6. Professional and ethical behavior
  11. Recognize variations in individual child needs and strategies to accommodate those needs.
    1. Planning for children with special needs and making accommodations
    2. Designing and adapting curriculum and environment for children's unique and individual needs
5. Repeatability - Moved to header area.
 
6. Methods of Evaluation -
Evaluation may include but is not limited to:
  1. Class participation
  2. Student journals
  3. Site visit
  4. Midterm
  5. Individual presentation
  6. Small group final project
7. Representative Text(s) -
Jackman, Hilda. Early Childhood Curriculum, A Child's Connection to the World. 4th edition. Delmar Publishing, 2009.
Curtis, Deb,and Margie Carter. Learning Together with Young Children. St. Paul, Minnesota: Redleaf Press, 2007. Text remains relevant to course content.
Faust Evitt, Marie. Thinking Big, Learning Big . Beltsville, MD: Gryphon House, 2009.

8. Disciplines -
Child Development
 
9. Method of Instruction -
  1. Lecture
  2. Discussion
  3. Cooperative learning exercises
  4. Oral project presentations
  5. Demonstration
  6. Video
  7. Guest speaker
  8. Field trips
 
10. Lab Content -
Not applicable.
 
11. Honors Description - No longer used. Integrated into main description section.
 
12. Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Reading and study of text
  2. Reading and written response to text questions, assignments, and relevant articles and reading materials
  3. Reaction/reflection writing to guest speakers, video viewings and experiences as projects and field trips
  4. Researching, planning and written evaluation of individual or group creative projects
13. Need/Justification -
This course is a restricted support course for the AA degree in Child Development.


Course status: Active
Last updated: 2014-03-11 15:01:30


Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines