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Effective: Summer 2013
GIST 52GEOSPATIAL DATA ACQUISITION & MANAGEMENT4 Unit(s)

Advisory: Advisory: Successful completion of GEOG 11 or GIST 11 and GEOG 12 or GIST 12; not open to students with credit in GEOG 52.
Grade Type: Letter Grade, the student may select Pass/No Pass
Not Repeatable.
FHGE: Non-GE Transferable: CSU
3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (72 hours total per quarter)

Student Learning Outcomes -
  • Demonstrate the process of converting analogue data to digital data for us in GIS.
  • Identify and discuss GIS data sources.
  • Create new GIS databases.
Description -
Study of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) science and its applications to spatial data management. Data acquisition using GPS, digitizing and scanning techniques. Data management. Editing and verifying. Raster data manipulation and importing. Database management. Advanced queries and database manipulation.

Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. Describe the concepts and applications of remote sensing, GPS, and affiliated data capture technologies.
  2. Demonstrate the process of field data collection, and converting analogue data to digital data for use in a GIS.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to compile existing data, collect, record, and utilize spatial data and databases.
  4. Evaluate Data Base Management Systems (DBMS) of specific GIS software and explain how to convert data between different formats.
  5. Create new GIS databases.
  6. Plan, evaluate and execute an original GIS project.

Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
PC Computer facilities and ESRI's ArcGIS software (or comparable vector & raster GIS software). Computer laboratory will also need Internet access

Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
  1. Basics of Geospatial data
    1. Data organization and formatting.
    2. Vector and raster data formats.
    3. Hierarchal, network, and relational databases
  2. Database design
    1. Differences between a georelational and object-based data model
    2. Methods to collect, create and process spatial data
    3. Database storage and interoperability
  3. Database schema implementation
    1. Database subtypes and domains
    2. Primary and foreign keys
    3. Data validation
    4. Relational databases
    5. Conversion between databases
  4. Vector data structure
    1. Vector data geometry
    2. Topological and non-topological features
    3. Topological relationship with a vector dataset
  5. Spatial data quality
    1. How to collect, record and utilize spatial data in a variety of environments
    2. How to create metadata
    3. Edit location errors from spatial data sources
    4. Identify sources of spatial data error
    5. Challenges associated with vector and raster data aggregation
  6. Raster data structure
    1. Methods of raster storage including run-length-encoding and quad-trees
    2. Attribute management
  7. Data Sources
    1. Scanning
    2. Heads up digitizing
    3. GPS
    4. Geocoding
    5. Public and private sources of data
  8. Plan, Evaluate and execute an original GIS project
    1. Identify an original problem of a geospatial nature
    2. Outline a strategy to solve the problem
    3. Locate relevant data sources
    4. Design and evaluate a plan to acquire the relevant data sources
    5. Incorporate data sources into a Geographic Information System and execute strategy to solve a geospatial problem
    6. Present assessment of results

Methods of Evaluation -
  1. Exam
  2. Laboratory projects
  3. Outside class project
  4. Oral presentation
Representative Text(s) -
Bolstad, Paul, GIS Fundamentals: A First Text on Geographic Information Systems, 4th edition, Eider Press, 2012.

Disciplines -
Geography or Drafting or Environmental Technologies or Forestry/Natural Resources
 
Method of Instruction -
Lecture presentations and classroom discussion. Demonstrations and hands-on exercises. Reading assignments.
 
Lab Content -
Hands on exercises relating to:
  1. Designing and Implementing a GIS
    1. Database design and management
    2. Fundamentals of data storage
    3. Database management
    4. Input of data with GPS
    5. Digitizing, scanning and editing
    6. Geospatial data resources
  2. GIS Data Sources
    1. Identify sources of digital GIS data
    2. Converting digital data to a uniform projection and scale.
    3. Vector-to-raster and raster-to-vector data conversions, error propagation and data base management.
  3. Plan, Evaluate and execute an Original GIS project
    1. Identify an original problem of a geospatial nature
    2. Outline a strategy to solve the problem
    3. Locate relevant data sources
    4. Design and evaluate a plan to acquire the relevant data sources
    5. Incorporate data sources into a Geographic Information System and execute strategy to solve a geospatial problem
    6. Present assessment of results
 
Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Reading Assignments: Weekly reading assignments from text and outside sources ranging from 30 to 60 pages per week.
  2. Lecture: Weekly lecture covering subject matter from text assignment with extended topic information. Class discussion is encouraged.
  3. Hands on Exercises and demonstrations: Weekly computer exercises. Each exercise covers assigned reading and lecture topics.