Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines

Language Arts Division
ENGL 1TINTEGRATED COMPOSITION & READINGFall 2012
5 hours leture.5 Units

Total Quarter Learning Hours: 60 (Total of All Lecture, Lecture/Lab, and Lab hours X 12)
 
 Lecture Hours: 5 Lab Hours: Lecture/Lab:
 Note: If Lab hours are specified, see item 10. Lab Content below.

Repeatability -
Statement: Not Repeatable.

Status -
 Course Status: ActiveGrading: Letter Grade Only
 Degree Status: ApplicableCredit Status: Credit
 Degree or Certificate Requirement: Certificate of Achievement,   Foothill GE
 GE Status: English

Articulation Office Information -
 Transferability: BothValidation: 10/21/13


Cross Listed as:
Related ID:ENGL 1S

1. Description -
Integrated reading and writing pathway that scaffolds instruction in freshman composition outcomes over two quarters, ENGL 1S and ENGL 1T respectively. Over this 2 quarter stretch, students read substantive quantities of college-level texts and write a total of 10,000 words, comprised of a minimum of 10 compositions (7 out-of-class and 3 in-class) to practice the techniques of critical reading, critical thinking, and written communication. Reading focused primarily on works of non-fiction prose, including published and student writing, chosen to represent a broad spectrum of opinions and ideas, writing styles, and cultural experiences. ENGL 1T is the second half of ENGL 1S/T.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1S.
Corequisite: ENGL 242B.
Advisory: Student should enroll with the same instructor as taken for ENGL 1S; if the student intends to use ENGL 1S & 1T combination to satisfy the Foothill General Education Requirement for Area II, English, the student must complete ENGL 1S & 1T. Also, to receive UC transfer credit for ENGL 1A, the student must complete ENGL 1S & 1T, and UC will transfer 5 units maximum for the combination of these two courses; student may enroll in ENGL 1T or 1A, but not both, for credit.

2. Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. Identify oneself as a part of larger academic discourse communities
    1. Demonstrate reading comprehension and construct meaning through summary
    2. Identify and synthesize inter-textual relationships among multiple works (published and student texts)
    3. Find, evaluate, analyze, and interpret primary and secondary sources, incorporating them into written essays using appropriate documentation format
    4. Comprehend writing prompts to understand context and purpose and meet expectations of the assignment, including timed writing
    5. Collaborate with others during the reading and writing process, offering constructive criticism and accepting the criticism of others
    6. Recognize differences and/or similarities in cultural value systems represented in various texts and within readers.
  2. Understand reading and writing as a means to think critically and to develop and articulate own perspectives
    1. Identify contexts, purposes, and rhetorical decisions that shape reading and writing in order to understand the nature of effective communication and discourse.
    2. Read primarily non-fiction texts actively and effectively and think critically about information acquired from readings, research, and other sources.
    3. Recognize and employ critical thinking skills including comprehension, application, analysis, evaluation, and synthesis.
    4. Articulate (verbally and in writing) own perspective based on critical evaluation of texts.
  3. Understand reading and writing as an integrated processes for meaning-making and communication
    1. Analyze college-level expository, narrative, and argumentative non-fiction prose for use as source information and/or model for writing
    2. Read and write extended expository compositions, increasing in length and complexity, that articulate a perspective in relation to and informed by whole texts and class discussion.
    3. Identify and formulate arguable theses.
    4. Identify and formulate logical and systematic patterns of organization
    5. Recognize and develop topics and main ideas at the paragraph level
    6. Identify syntactical structures and apply to the editing of writing to achieve sentence variety and maturity.
    7. Use vocabulary strategies to identify and produce diction (including connotative language) and tone appropriate to the content, audience, and purpose of the specific writing task.
    8. Identify grammatical patterns and apply to the proofreading of writing to the degree that the nature and frequency of errors do not become distracting.
  4. Reflect on their own reading and writing processes as an avenue to achieving greater control of these processes and increased effectiveness as a reader and writer
    1. Use strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proofreading their own work
    2. Evaluate own writing as an advanced critical reader at the essay, paragraph, and sentence levels.
  5. Understand and value of academic integrity and demonstrate ethical conduct.
    1. Integrate appropriate text citations and MLA documentation.
3. Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
  1. When taught on campus, smart classroom
  2. When taught in hybrid (maximum 20% online), on-going access to computer with Email software and capabilities; Email address.

4. Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
  1. Identifies oneself as a part of larger academic discourse communities
    1. Demonstrate comprehension and construct meaning through summary
      1. patterns of organization
      2. topics and sub-topics
      3. topic questions
      4. sections
      5. reverse outlines
      6. graphic organizers
      7. paraphrasing
    2. Identify and synthesize inter-textual relationships among multiple works (published and student texts)
      1. key concepts / common themes
      2. points and counterpoints
    3. Find, evaluate, analyze, and interpret primary and secondary sources, incorporating them into written essays using appropriate documentation format
    4. Comprehend writing prompts to understand context and purpose and meet expectations of the assignment, including timed writing
    5. Collaborate with others during the reading and writing process, offering constructive criticism and accepting the criticism of others
      1. collaborative reading (e.g., book groups, group annotations, student-generated questions)
      2. collaborative writing (e.g., presentations, paragraphs)
      3. skills in constructive verbal and written feedback
      4. workshop student writing (e.g., whole essay, thesis statements, paragraphs)
      5. peer response/peer review
      6. peer editing
    6. Recognize differences and/or similarities in cultural value systems represented in various texts and within readers.
      1. worldview (based on factors such as gender, culture, religion, history, ethnicity)
      2. connotative language
      3. bias
  2. Understand reading and writing as a means to think critically and to develop and articulate own perspectives
    1. Identify contexts, purposes, and rhetorical decisions that shape reading and writing in order to understand the nature of effective communication and discourse
    2. Read primarily non-fiction texts (published and peer texts) and think critically about information acquired from readings, research, and other sources
      1. Preparation for reading:
        1. Purpose
        2. pre-reading
          1. visual and formatting clues, including titles, sub-titles, call-outs, boldface, etc.
        3. previewing
        4. prior knowledge/schema
        5. predicting
      2. Active reading:
        1. Annotation
        2. Quote selection and paraphrasing
        3. Dialectic/double-entry journaling
        4. Questioning
        5. Purposeful discussion
    3. Recognize and employ critical thinking skills including comprehension, application, analysis, evaluation, and synthesis.
      1. Integration of multiple modes of rhetoric and critical thinking processes
        1. Audience and purpose
        2. Critical thinking processes
          1. cause/effect; comparison/contrast; process; chronology; problem-solution; condition; narration
        3. Rhetorical patterns of organization
          1. cause/effective; comparison/contrast; process; chronology; problem-solution; condition; narration
    4. Articulate and situation own perspectives in relation to texts
      1. worldview (based on factors such as gender, culture, religion, history, ethnicity)
      2. biases
  3. Understand reading and writing as an integrated processes for meaning-making and communication
    1. Analyze college-level expository, narrative, and argumentative non-fiction prose for use as source information and/or model for writing
      1. Draw and communicate reasoned inferences based on careful reading of a text to construct meaning
        1. Analysis of whole text
        2. Summary versus interpretation
      2. Cultural contexts
        1. Audience awareness
      3. Rhetorical form
        1. Genre
        2. Purpose
        3. Style, voice
      4. Organizational patterns based on the above
        1. Internal consistency
          1. Transitions
        2. Concessions
      5. Main ideas and support based on the above
        1. Logical use of evidence
      6. Syntax and diction based on the above
        1. Varied sentence structures to show logical relationships
        2. Transitions
        3. Concessions
        4. Word choice
    2. Read and write extended expository compositions, increasing in length and complexity, that articulate a perspective in relation to and informed by whole texts and class discussion.
      1. Apply reading and writing processes
        1. Post-reading: comprehension check and reflective response
          1. graphic organizers
          2. reverse outlining
          3. summary
          4. informal written responses
          5. questioning
          6. purposeful discussion
        2. Pre-writing:
          1. brainstorming, concept mapping
          2. outlining
        3. Drafting (multiple stages)
          1. ideas / content
          2. working thesis
          3. organization
          4. main ideas
          5. evidence
        4. Post-drafting
          1. peer response
          2. revision for content, thesis refinement, organization, main ideas, support
          3. editing for transitions, sentence variety, word choice
          4. proofreading for mechanics, including grammar and format
    3. Identify and formulate arguable theses.
      1. Stated and implied
      2. Thesis locations
    4. Identify and formulate logical and systematic patterns of organization
      1. Intro, body, conclusion
      2. Patterns of organization
        1. chronology, classification, condition, definition, process, comparison/contrast, cause/effect, etc.
      3. Lines of reasoning
      4. Advanced annotation: sectioning using text clues
      5. Transitional signals
    5. Recognize paragraph organization and structure
      1. Recognize and develop topics and main ideas at the paragraph level
        1. Related to thesis (whole text)
        2. Topics and sub-topics
        3. Stated and implied main ideas
        4. Generality and specificity (major and minor)
          1. generalizing implied main ideas from details
        5. Relationships between/among main ideas
        6. Recognize, identify, and select supporting evidence
          1. Types of evidence, e.g., facts, testimony, opinions
          2. Credibility of source
          3. Related to main idea(s)
          4. Integrated appropriately (Context and Accuracy)
    6. Identify syntactical structures and apply to the editing of writing to achieve sentence variety and maturity.
      1. Coordination
      2. subordination, including concession
      3. modifiers: adjective clauses, noun phrase appositives, verbal phrases
    7. Use vocabulary strategies to identify and produce diction (including connotative language) and tone appropriate to the content, audience, and purpose of the specific writing task.
      1. vocabulary in context: relevance to comprehension of main ideas and writer's purpose
      2. word part analysis: grammatical function (part of speech)
      3. dictionary use: understand multiple meanings to choose meaning appropriate to context
    8. Identify grammatical patterns and apply to the proofreading of writing to the degree that the nature and frequency of errors do not become distracting.
      1. Rules of punctuation, including commas, quotation marks, apostrophes
      2. Common errors: fragments, comma splices
  4. Reflect on their own reading and writing processes as an avenue to achieving greater control of these processes and increased effectiveness as a reader and writer
    1. Use strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proofreading their own work
    2. Evaluate own writing as an advanced critical reader at the essay, paragraph, and sentence levels.
  5. Understand and value of academic integrity and demonstrate ethical conduct.
    1. Integrate appropriate text citations and MLA documentation of the work of others
5. Repeatability - Moved to header area.
 
6. Methods of Evaluation -
  1. Informal assessment options
    1. Journals, including blogs and/or online posts
    2. Free-writes
    3. Annotations
    4. Discussions / Debates
    5. Informal presentations
    6. Author dialogs
    7. Quizzes
  2. High-Stakes
    1. Options
      1. Formal presentations
      2. Tests
    2. Required: (note evaluations below required over 2 quarters, including ENGL 42S and ENGL 42T)
      1. Tests: at least 3 timed/in-class essays
      2. Formal essays (7)
7. Representative Text(s) -
At least three full-length books (two of which must be single-author, book-length texts and one of which may be an anthology, course reader, or reading/writing apparatus). Texts should primarily be non-fiction, supplemented at instructor's discretion with additional readings, handbook, or dictionary.(NOTE: number of texts described are required over 2 quarters, including ENGL 1S and ENGL 1T)
  1. The following are suggested single-author, book-length texts for the course, representing a range of genres and topics.
    1. Ackerman, D. Deep Play. Vintage Books, 2000
    2. Finkel, David. The Good Soldiers. New York: Sarah Crichton /Farrar, Straus And Giroux, 2009.
    3. Gilbault, Rose Castillo. Farmworker's Daughter: Growing Up Mexican in America. Berkeley: Heyday, 2006.
    4. Gladwell, Malcolm. The Outliers: The Story of Success. New York: Back Bay Books, 2009.
    5. Goldsmith, Suzanne. A City Year. The New Press, 1989
    6. Herzgaard, Mark. Earth Odyssey: Around the World in Search of our Environmental Future. Broadway Books, 1999
    7. Krackauer, J. Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster. Anchor Books, 1998
    8. Lamott, Anne. Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on the Writing Life. Anchor Books, 1995
    9. Levitt and Dubner. Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side to Everything. New York: Harper, 2009.
    10. Orwell George, Down and Out in Paris and London. Penguin Paperback
    11. Salzman, Mark. True Notebooks: A Writer's Year at Juvenile Hall. New York: Vintage, 2004.
    12. Sobel, Dava. Galileo's Daughter. Walker Press, 1999
    13. Takaki, Ronald. A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America. Boston: Little, Brown, and Co., 1993
    14. Welty, Eudora. One Writer's Beginnings. Warner Books, 1991
  2. The following are suggested anthologies for the course:
    1. Barnet, Sylvan and Bedau, Hugo. Current Issues and Enduring Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking and Argument, with Readings, 4th Ed. Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martin's Press, 1996
    2. Berens and Rosen. Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum, 6th Ed. New York: Longman, 1997
    3. Colombo, Gary, Robert Cullen, and Bonnie Lisle. Rereading America: Cultural Contexts for Critical Thinking and Writing. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martins, 2010. Print.
    4. Lunsford, Andrea. Everything's an Argument, with Readings. 5th ed. Bedford/St. Martin's Press. 22 Jan. 2010.
  3. The following are suggested reading/writing apparati for the course:
    1. Bizzel, Patricia and Herzberg, Bruce. Negotiating Difference: Cultural Case Studies for Composition. Boston: Bedford Books, 1996
    2. Cavitch, D. Life Studies: A Thematic Reader, 7th Ed. Bedford Books/St. Martin's Press, 2001
    3. Graff, Gerald, and Cathy Birkenstein. They Say / I Say: the Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2010.
    4. Kennedy, X.J. The Bedford Guide for College Writers: With Reader, 5th Ed. New York: St.Martin's Press, 1996
    5. Lunsford, Andrea. Everything's an Argument, 5th ed. Bedford/St. Martin's Press. 23 Dec. 2009.
    6. McQuade, D. and McQuade, C. Seeing and Writing. Bedford Books/St.Martin's Press. 2000
  4. The following is department adopted handbook for the course:
    1. Keene, Easy Access: The Reference Handbook for Writers, 4th Ed. McGraw-Hill, 2005

When taught via Foothill Global Access: supplemental lectures, handouts, tests, and assignments delivered online; feedback on tests and assignments delivered online; class discussion may be delivered in chat rooms, discussion forums, and/or newsgroups.

8. Disciplines -
English
 
9. Method of Instruction -
Lecture.
 
10. Lab Content -
Not applicable.
 
11. Honors Description - No longer used. Integrated into main description section.
 
12. Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Reading non-fiction essays and at least two book-length works
  2. Journal responses to readings
  3. Written analysis of readings
13. Need/Justification -
This course, when taken in conjunction with ENGL 1S, is a core course for the Certificate of Achievement in Transfer CSU and satisfies the Foothill GE Requirements for Area II, English. The integrated reading and writing pathway scaffolds instruction in freshman composition and reading outcomes over two quarters, ENGL 1S and ENGL 1T respectively. The pathway, in concert with integrated reading and writing pedagogy and the metacognitive portfolio development co-requisite course, can address and improve success and retention rates in for a significant population of students.


Course status: Active
Last updated: 2013-12-06 10:16:13


Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines