Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines

Physical Sciences, Mathematics & Engineering Division
ENGR 39ENERGY, SOCIETY & THE ENVIRONMENTSummer 2013
4 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory.5 Units

Total Quarter Learning Hours: 84 (Total of All Lecture, Lecture/Lab, and Lab hours X 12)
 
 Lecture Hours: 4 Lab Hours: 3 Lecture/Lab:
 Note: If Lab hours are specified, see item 10. Lab Content below.

Repeatability -
Statement: Not Repeatable.

Status -
 Course Status: ActiveGrading: Letter Grade with P/NP option
 Degree Status: ApplicableCredit Status: Credit
 Degree or Certificate Requirement: AS Degree,   Foothill GE
 GE Status: Natural Sciences (w/laboratory)

Articulation Office Information -
 Transferability: BothValidation: 11-11-11; 11/15/12

1. Description -
Guides the general education student without a science or technology background through humanity's efforts to harness and generate energy, for industry, work, habitat and recreation. Serves as a formal introduction to work, energy and efficiency, from human's earliest endeavors building pyramids to the development of railroads, the automobile and airplane, nuclear power, and alternative energy sources. Topics include energy, work, and power, steam and internal combustion engine, electricity, cars and transportation, and atomic energy. Emphasis on the environmental impact from acid rain, smog and the greenhouse effect, to pollution from coal, natural gas, and petroleum extraction, to nuclear accidents. Includes a comprehensive overview of sustainable energy systems, megacities, LEED and high efficiency buildings, and integrated food, water, and transportation services. Discussion and reflection on global population and consumption driven economic models.
Prerequisite: None
Co-requisite: None
Advisory: MATH 10 or 57.

2. Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. describe the relationships between energy and power and how mechanical systems harness energy to do work.
  2. discuss the human history of energy use, and relate it to how we arrived at our current energy situation.
  3. explain and analyze the theories of climate change and the greenhouse effect by evaluating current scientific data and numerical models.
  4. compare the challenges and options for clean energy development in our energy system.
  5. develop strategies for the environmental, political, and economic consequences of fossil fuel dependence.
  6. conduct and document simple energy and greenhouse gas audits and develop personal climate action plans.
  7. explain efficiency and sustainability as a design principle in energy systems, buildings, and end-use applications.
  8. discuss, evaluate, and propose policy development strategies for clean energy solutions worldwide, including in megacities.
3. Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
Laboratory equipment for energy demonstrations
  1. Multimeters
  2. Kill-a-Watt meter
  3. PV kits
  4. Wind demonstration kit
  5. GHG kit
  6. Batteries and fuel cells

4. Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
  1. Describe the relationships between energy and power and how mechanical systems harness energy to do work.
    1. Modern Energy and Work
      1. Force and energy
      2. Chemical energy
      3. Physics and work
    2. Steam engines, internal combustion, and turbines
      1. Henry Watt
      2. Internal combustion (reciprocating) engines
      3. Turbines (hydroelectric and gas)
  2. Discuss the human history of energy use, and relate it to how we arrived at our current energy situation.
    1. Historic use of energy and work
      1. Epochs of human history and energy
      2. Hunter gatherer, agriculture, industrial
      3. Relationship of energy, wealth, and development
    2. Early human energy
      1. Fire
      2. Wood, charcoal
      3. Animals
    3. Early human work
      1. Ore, mining and metal refining
      2. Steel and glass fabrication
      3. Agriculture (plow)
  3. Explain and analyze the theories of climate change and the greenhouse effect by evaluating current scientific data and numerical models.
    1. Energy and the environment
      1. Impact of agriculture and farming
      2. Early use of coal in Europe
      3. Coal mining and air pollution
      4. Natural gas extraction (fracking)
      5. Petroleum and air pollution
      6. Oil drilling and unconventional petroleum
    2. Greenhouse Gasses and climate change
      1. Principles of climate science
      2. Measurements of GHGs and correlation to carbon
      3. Observations of current warming
      4. Radiative forcing and future warming projections
      5. Observation of climate change and global concerns
  4. Compare the challenges and options for clean energy development in our energy system.
    1. Electricity and the power grid
      1. Electricity principles
      2. Modern electrical systems
      3. Primary energy for electricity
      4. Electricity and economic development
    2. Primary energy inputs
      1. Coal
      2. Natural gas
      3. Petroleum
      4. Hydroelectric
      5. Wind
      6. Solar
      7. Geothermal
      8. Nuclear
    3. Renewable & Alternative energy
      1. Solar PV
      2. Wind
      3. Geothermal
      4. Biomass
      5. Biofuels
    4. Transportation (petroleum) and petroleum development
      1. Preindustrial and agricultural transportation
      2. Bicycles
      3. Railroads
      4. Automobiles
      5. Airplanes
    5. Future transportation innovation and systems
      1. Electric vehicles
      2. Alternative fuels
      3. Personal Rapid Transit
      4. High speed rail
  5. Develop strategies for the environmental, political, and economic consequences of fossil fuel dependence.
    1. Industrial economies and energy
      1. Relationship of economic development, wealth and energy
      2. Energy systems in the developing world, and energy poverty
      3. Energy for manufacturing, agriculture, and service economies
    2. Energy and society
      1. Energy and prosperity
      2. Energy poverty
      3. Environmental Justice
  6. Conduct and document simple energy and greenhouse gas audits and develop personal climate action plans.
    1. Home energy and building audits
      1. Reading energy bills
      2. Building walk through
      3. KwHrs and therms
      4. Plug loads (appliances)
    2. Climate Action Plans
      1. Development of Corporate CAPs
      2. Case studies of existing CAPs
      3. Personal/Residential CAPs
  7. Explain efficiency and sustainability as a design principle in energy systems, buildings, and end-use applications.
    1. Energy efficiency
      1. Building energy efficiency
      2. LEED building (design and construction)
      3. Net Zero energy buildings
      4. Integrated PV (BIPV)
      5. Water use and recycling
    2. Sustainability by design
      1. Efficiency as a first principle
      2. Systems integration of services
      3. Working with natural earth services
      4. Zero impact and environmental remediation
  8. Discuss, evaluate, and propose policy development strategies for clean energy solutions worldwide, including in megacities.
    1. Geopolitical impacts
      1. Resource wars (historic)
      2. Current geopolitical conflict
      3. Energy security and policy
    2. Energy and policy
      1. EPA
      2. CPUC
      3. Renewable energy initiatives
      4. Climate change advocacy
      5. Social movements (Power Shifts)
    3. Megacities
      1. Human urban migration
      2. Population trends and cities (global)
      3. Environmental impact of megacities
      4. Integrated design of energy, water, food, transportation
      5. Self sufficiency as a design goal
5. Repeatability - Moved to header area.
 
6. Methods of Evaluation -
  1. Written Assignments, including Problem Sets
  2. May include Exams
  3. In-class activities, may be group or individual work
  4. Group Lab Reports
  5. Group Project and Presentation
7. Representative Text(s) -
Mackay, David J.C. Sustainable Energy Without the Hot Air. UIT Cambridge Limited. 2009. ISBN 978-09544529-3-3 (paperback)

8. Disciplines -
Engineering
Chemistry
Physics
 
9. Method of Instruction -
  1. Lecture
  2. Reading & writing assignments
  3. Demonstrations
  4. Hands-on group activities
  5. Laboratory experiments
  6. Site visits.
  7. Students may additionally attend energy and environmental seminars at academic and commercial institutions.
 
10. Lab Content -
  1. Energy units and calculations
    1. Scientific units
    2. Use of a scientific calculator
  2. Energy meters and measurements
    1. Multimeters
    2. Constructing a small electrical circuit
    3. Replication & verification of Ohm's Law
    4. Error Analysis
  3. Energy systems on campus and in our environment
    1. Tour of Foothill College
    2. Tour of community energy (electrical infrastructure)
    3. Overview of gas pipelines
    4. Evaluation & analysis of campus energy data
  4. Home energy audits (building energy audit on campus)
    1. Examination & analysis of student energy bills
    2. Use of a Kill-a-watt meter
    3. Smart meter demonstration (Web login)
    4. Foothill College Web login
  5. GHG audits / green house effect
    1. Simulating the Greenhouse Effect
    2. CO2 created from burning fuel
    3. Dissolving CO2 in water (pH)
    4. GHG audit (large group exercise)
    5. Personal GHG audit (understanding energy use)
    6. Carbon offsets (soil)
  6. Building energy efficiency
    1. Tour of NASA Ames Sustainability base
    2. Net Zero buildings
    3. Bloom Fuel cells
  7. High efficiency homes
    1. Tour of high efficiency home (e.g. Los Altos straw bale home)
    2. Optional trip to Pacific Energy Center
    3. Optional trip to Kirsch Center
  8. Solar PV demonstration
    1. Lab kit demonstration
    2. Solar site analysis
      1. Calculation of sun path
      2. Prediction of solar energy output for test site
      3. Comparison of data with existing solar panels on campus
    3. Inverter data analysis
  9. Wind energy
    1. Wind kit demonstration
    2. Wind calculations & energy output predictions
    3. Wind measurements (outdoors)
    4. Wind wiring diagram (integration)
  10. Life-Cycle Assessment of Commonly Used Consumer Goods
    1. Identification of relevant energy and material inputs and environmental releases
    2. Evaluation of the potential impacts associated with identified inputs and releases
    3. Interpretation of results
  11. Electric Vehicles and Energy Storage
    1. Basic fuel cells
    2. Electric vehicle demonstration
    3. Tesla office tour
    4. Coulomb charger demonstration
 
11. Honors Description - No longer used. Integrated into main description section.
 
12. Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Required reading: Students will be assigned to read chapters out of the representative texts, current news articles, scientific papers. e.g. A Department of Energy publication on current trends in renewable energy.
  2. Required writing: Students may be required to provide written answers (1-2 pages in length) to questions based on the reading assignments, submit a final project (8-10 pages in length), submit write-ups for laboratory exercises/site visits. e.g. Develop and articulate a simple personal or family Climate Action Plan (CAP).
  3. Required computation/exercises: Students may be required to complete numerical exercises at the end of the chapters, complete computational activities both in lecture and in lab, individually and as a group. e.g. Lab notebook may include an energy audit of a residence or building with energy calculations based on acquired data.
13. Need/Justification -
This course is a restricted support course for the A.S. degree in Engineering.


Course status: Active
Last updated: 2014-03-20 07:23:05


Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines