Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines

Language Arts Division
ENGL 209INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE READINGSpring 2011
5 hours lecture.5 Units

Total Quarter Learning Hours: 60 (Total of All Lecture, Lecture/Lab, and Lab hours X 12)
 
 Lecture Hours: 5 Lab Hours: Lecture/Lab:
 Note: If Lab hours are specified, see item 10. Lab Content below.

Repeatability -
Statement: Not Repeatable.

Status -
 Course Status: ActiveGrading: Letter Grade with P/NP option
 Degree Status: Non-ApplicableCredit Status: Basic Skills-2
 Degree or Certificate Requirement: Stand Alone Course
 GE Status: Non-GE

Articulation Office Information -
 Transferability: NoneValidation:

1. Description -
Techniques of critical analysis for reading-college level prose, focusing primarily on expository/argumentative essays and textbook materials. Students learn to comprehend text holistically, identifying and expressing critical elements of comprehension. Practice and testing to be done on authentic text of one or more page length and with written responses. Lecture, discussion, group work, and individualized instruction.
Prerequisite: None
Co-requisite: None
Advisory: Not open to students with credit in ENGL 100 or 108.

2. Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate proficiency in various vocabulary strategies.
  2. Identify and express critical elements of comprehension from text of increasing difficulty: writer's topic, purpose, sections, detail, main ideas, thesis.
  3. Identify a writer's organizational plan(s) by following the progression of ideas in text.
  4. Summarize the writer's main ideas of a multiple paragraph piece in complete sentences.
  5. Infer implied elements along with the writer's tone and style.
  6. Understand meaning and purpose of connotative language.
  7. Critically evaluate writer's information.
  8. Identify and analyze points of comparison between texts and articulate similarities and differences; express comparisons in writing projects requiring synthesis (summary and/or critique)
  9. Compare and contrast voices which reflect a diversity of cultural and social milieus.
3. Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
None.

4. Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
  1. Using vocabulary strategies
    1. Decoding
    2. Context clues
    3. Dictionary use
    4. Multiple meanings
    5. Master new words in context of class readings
  2. Finding and expressing critical elements of comprehension together in authentic text
    1. All of following found holistically, i.e. identified together so that connections between elements become apparent
    2. All of following expressed in written form: phrases, sentences, paragraphs, summaries, other writing projects
    3. Topic and purpose for topic
      1. strategies for locating stated topic
      2. when implied, generalizing subtopics
      3. expressing what writer is doing with topic; the question being addressed.
    4. Detail
      1. categorized as major or minor
      2. generalized to express implied main idea
      3. evaluated as to effectiveness
    5. Sections and main ideas
      1. using structure clues: paragraphing, transitions
      2. using TEXT clues: title, thesis, changes in point/detail
      3. when main idea implied, generalizing from detail
      4. revising or refining a tentative main idea as text is read
    6. Thesis
      1. common locations (introduction/conclusion)
      2. generalized from main ideas if implied
  3. Identify organizational plan
    1. Using text clues to follow logical progression of ideas, e.g. paragraphing, transitional words/phrases.
    2. Identifying common writing plans: chronological, classification, process, comparison/contrast, cause/effect
  4. Summarizing
    1. Distinguishing between summary and critique and their different uses.
    2. Sectioning to identify the topic and the distinct points made.
    3. Paraphrasing/inferring main point for each section
    4. Recognizing the organizational plan and reflecting this logical progression of ideas by the use of appropriate transitions.
    5. Organizing ideas into a paragraph length summary, either in written or oral form
  5. Inferring information
    1. Recognizing formatting, visual, and word clues
    2. Distinguish between informational, expository, and persuasive purposes
    3. Recognizing implied comprehension elements
      1. locating and generalizing subtopics
      2. locating and generalizing detail into main points
      3. generalizing/summing up main points into thesis
    4. Recognizing bias and purpose
    5. Recognizing intended audience
  6. Understanding meaning and purpose of connotative language
    1. Distinguishing between denotation and connotation
    2. Distinguishing shades of meaning
    3. Recognizing appropriate word denotation/connotation in context
  7. Evaluating author's information
    1. Recognizing author's credibility and expertise
    2. Recognizing types of evidence
    3. Evaluating evidence
  8. Comparing then synthesizing ideas from two or more texts
    1. Similarities
    2. Differences
  9. Comparing diverse voices
    1. Cultural
    2. Social
    3. Gender
    4. Discipline specific
5. Repeatability - Moved to header area.
 
6. Methods of Evaluation -
  1. Tests and quizzes to diagnose comprehension skills.
    1. At least four exams that ask student to identify and express critical elements of comprehension on 1-2 page length text of increasing difficulty.
    2. Emphasis on short answer/essay tests and quizzes that diagnose students' abilities to state main ideas in their own words rather than select from predetermined choices.
    3. Summary final on text of 1-2 pages
  2. Writing assignments based on readings
    1. Summary practices/quizzes
    2. One synthesis project, e.g. short paper, demonstrating summary and synthesis skills of two or more texts
    3. One inference project, e.g. short paper, demonstrating ability to make and support inferences
  3. Individually assigned projects.
7. Representative Text(s) -
The following texts are those used in a typical ENGL 209 (or 108 reading section):
Selection of a text from "A" is required for all ENGL 209 (or 108 reading section) classes; if "A" does not include college-level reading materials for practices, a selection form "B" is required.
  1. Textbook/workbook that explains how to read a variety of materials at graded levels up through college-level prose and that offers a variety of practice exercises in the active reading formats. Suggested texts are:
Alexander, R. and Lombardi, J. A Community of Readers. New York: Longman, 2007.
DiYanni, R. Putting It Together. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2003.
Garrigus, R. The Inquiring Reader. Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 2001.
George, D. Reading Culture: Contexts for Critical Reading and Writing: New York: Pearson, 2007.
Mather, and McCarthy. Reading and All That Jazz. NY: McGraw-Hill, 2007.
McGrath, J.L. Building Strategies for College Reading: A Text and Thematic Reader. NJ: Prentice Hall, 2004.
Seyler, Dorothy. The Reading Context. 2nd ed. Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 2000.
Smith, Brenda. Bridging the Gap. 6th ed. New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2007.
B. Book-length non-fiction, collection of essays (reader), magazines, newspapers, all at or near college-level:
Atwan, R. America Now. 4th ed. Bedford/St. Martin's, 2005
Ehrenreich, Barbara. Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, Owl
Books, 2002.
Kozol, Jonathan. Savage Inequalities. NY: Harper Perennial, 1992.
Rogers and Rogers. Patterns and Themes, 4th ed. Belmont, CA. Wadsworth, 2000.
Warner, J. S. and Hilliard, J. Visions Across the Americas, 6th ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 2006.
Warner, J.S. and Swanson, B. Projections: Brief Readings on American Culture. 2nd ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 2002.

8. Disciplines -
English
Reading
 
9. Method of Instruction - No content
 
10. Lab Content -
Not applicable.
 
11. Honors Description - No longer used. Integrated into main description section.
 
12. Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Tests and quizzes to diagnose comprehension skills.
    1. At least four exams that ask student to identify and express critical elements of comprehension on 1-2 page length text of increasing difficulty.
    2. Emphasis on short answer/essay tests and quizzes that diagnose students' abilities to state main ideas in their own words rather than select from predetermined choices.
    3. Summary final on text of 1-2 pages
  2. Writing assignments based on readings
    1. Summary practices/quizzes
    2. One synthesis project, e.g. short paper, demonstrating summary and synthesis skills of two or more texts
    3. One inference project, e.g. short paper, demonstrating ability to make and support inferences
  3. Individually assigned projects
13. Need/Justification -
This course is prepares students for the critical reading and critical thinking necessary to be in successful in college courses. As the unofficial "portal course" to the college, this course provides an introduction to college study skills and assignment preparation required for college work.


Course status: Active
Last updated: 2013-09-23 09:56:43


Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines