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Effective: Summer 2014
ESLL 226HIGH-INTERMEDIATE GRAMMAR5 Unit(s)

Advisory: Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in ESLL 227; not open to students with credit in ESL 156.
Grade Type: Letter Grade, the student may select Pass/No Pass
Not Repeatable.
FHGE: Non-GE Transferable: None
5 hours lecture. (60 hours total per quarter)

Student Learning Outcomes -
  • Correctly use modals in the past and present: advisability, regret and certainty
  • Correctly use the present perfect, simple past and past progressive.
Description -
A high-intermediate English course for non-native speakers focusing on comprehension, communication, and grammatical accuracy. Emphasis on understanding and communication of new information, conjectures, and logical relationships in spoken and written contexts. Computer or workbook activities to reinforce knowledge of structures.

Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. correctly use the following structures in complete sentences in connected spoken English and in short pieces of writing about new information, conjectures, and logical relationships with special attention to the diverse cultures and perspectives represented by the students in the class:
    1. present, present progressive, past, past progressive, future, present perfect, and present perfect progressive;
    2. present and past passive;
    3. modals reflecting past time (could have, may have, might have, should have, must have);
    4. logical modals of probability (might, must, and should) in limited contexts.
  2. recognize and differentiate the meaning of the following structures in connected spoken English and in short pieces of writing about new information, conjectures, and logical relationships with special attention to the diverse cultures and perspectives represented by the students in the class:
    1. past perfect and past perfect progressive tense;
    2. pairs of participial adjectives such as interested / interesting, bored / boring, boiled/boiling;
    3. real and unreal conditionals in the present and future time.
  3. identify adjectives and adverbs.
Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
None required.

Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
  1. Conversations, oral presentations, and writing assignments about new information, conjectures, and logical relationships with attention to understanding and valuing differences among the cultures represented in the class using as appropriate the present, present progressive, past, past progressive, future, present perfect, and present perfect progressive tenses; present and past passives; modals reflecting past time; logical modals of probability:
    1. Extended descriptions of a person or place
    2. Narratives about personal, historical, and cultural events
    3. Short autobiographies and personal histories
    4. Conversations consisting of requests, questions, affirmative and negative statements, and responses
  2. Listening and reading comprehension activites about about new information, conjectures, and logical relationships with attention to understanding and valuing differences among the cultures represented in the class in which, in addition to the above structures, students identify and differentiate the past perfect and past perfect progressive; participial adjectives; adjectives and adverbs; and real and unreal conditionals in the present and future time:
    1. Extended descriptions of a person or place
    2. Narratives about personal, historical, and cultural events
    3. Short autobiographies and personal histories
    4. Conversations consisting of requests, questions, affirmative and negative statements, and responses
    5. Conversations and narratives about conjectures, regrets, past possibilities, and logical inferences.
Methods of Evaluation -
  1. Communicative, contextualized in-class assignments
  2. Homework
  3. Oral and written production of extended discourse
  4. Tests
Representative Text(s) -
Instructors must choose a textbook from the list below. If, however, a faculty member would prefer to use a textbook not on the list, he or she must contact a full-time faculty member who regularly teaches the course to explain how the adoption would serve to achieve the learning outcomes specified in the course outline of record.

Fuchs, Marjorie, and Margaret Bonner. Focus on Grammar: A High-Intermediate Course Workbook, 4th Edition. White Plains, NY: Pearson Longman, 2012.
Azar, Betty. Understanding and Using English Grammar, 4th ed., White Plains,New York: Pearson Education, 2009.

Disciplines -
English As a Second Language
 
Method of Instruction -
Lecture, Discussion, Demonstration.
 
Lab Content -
Not applicable.
 
Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Readings in the text and other sources.
  2. Writing of sentences and paragraphs to practice targeted grammatical structures.