Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines

Business and Social Sciences Division
GEOG 1PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHYSpring 2014
4 hours lecture, 1 hour lecture-laboratory, 2 hours laboratory.5 Units

Total Quarter Learning Hours: 84 (Total of All Lecture, Lecture/Lab, and Lab hours X 12)
 
 Lecture Hours: 4 Lab Hours: 2 Lecture/Lab: 1
 Note: If Lab hours are specified, see item 10. Lab Content below.

Repeatability -
Statement: Not Repeatable.

Status -
 Course Status: ActiveGrading: Letter Grade with P/NP option
 Degree Status: ApplicableCredit Status: Credit
 Degree or Certificate Requirement: Certificate of Achievement,   AS Degree,   Foothill GE
 GE Status: Natural Sciences (w/laboratory)

Articulation Office Information -
 Transferability: BothValidation: 07/01/2006; 11/14/12

1. Description -
Study of the Earth's surface, including the earth's dimensions and systems; atmospheric processes; patterns of climate, vegetation and soils; and features, processes and interactions of land, water and various energy sources. Use of maps for interpretation.
Prerequisite: None
Co-requisite: None
Advisory: Demonstrated proficiency in English by placement into ENGL 1A as determined by score on the English placement test or through an equivalent placement process; MATH 220.

2. Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. Use maps, graphs and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to interpret data.
  2. Explain the causes of season, climate patterns, and major landforms.
  3. Describe the function and composition of the atmosphere, and how it affects our daily lives.
  4. Discuss the hydrologic cycle, and the distribution and allocation of water resources for humans.
  5. Describe the structure of the solid earth and relate it to such phenomena as earthquakes, mountain ranges and volcanoes.
  6. Discuss the potentials & limitations of scientific innovations to mitigate natural hazards.
  7. Evaluate the effects of the atmosphere and the hydrosphere on the lithosphere.
  8. Assess activities through which humans have modified the natural landscape.
  9. Relate climate patterns and soils to the Earth's ecosystems.
3. Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
For laboratory activities, students will need computers with internet access. When taught as an online distance learning section, students and faculty need ongoing and continuous Internet and E-mail access.

4. Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
  1. Use maps, graphs and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to interpret data.
    1. The field of physical geography.
      1. The Earth in space; seasons.
      2. The scientific method.
    2. The physical Earth.
      1. Instrumentation and methods used to study the Earth.
      2. Remote sensing.
      3. GIS
      4. Analysis and interpretation of maps.
      5. Analysis and interpretation of graphs and data animations.
    3. The atmosphere: Weather and Climate
      1. Isolation and the electromagnetic spectrum.
      2. Surface temperature.
      3. Atmospheric pressure and wind.
      4. Air masses.
      5. Classifications of climate.
    4. The Lithosphere
      1. Plate tectonics.
      2. Volcanism, earthquakes, orogenesis.
      3. Weathering: atmosphere/hydrosphere/lithosphere interaction.
    5. The Hydroshere.
      1. Distribution of water on earth.
      2. The water cycle.
      3. Water resources: distribution and allocation.
    6. The Biosphere
      1. Soil formation and classifications.
      2. Ecosystems and biomes.
  2. Explain the causes of seasons, climate patterns, and major landforms.
    1. The atmosphere: Weather and Climate
      1. Isolation and the electromagnetic spectrum.
      2. Surface temperature.
      3. Atmospheric pressure and wind.
      4. Air masses.
      5. Classifications of climate.
    2. The Lithosphere
      1. Plate tectonics.
      2. Volcanism, earthquakes, orogenesis.
      3. Weathering: atmosphere/hydrosphere/lithosphere interaction.
    3. The Hydroshere.
      1. Distribution of water on earth.
      2. The water cycle.
      3. Fresh water resources: distribution and allocation.
  3. Describe the function and composition of the atmosphere, and how it affects our daily lives.
    1. Isolation and the electromagnetic spectrum.
    2. Surface temperature.
    3. Atmospheric pressure and wind.
    4. Air masses.
    5. Violent weather: Hurricanes, tornadoes, and thunderstorms
  4. Discuss the hydrologic cycle, and evaluate the distribution and allocation of water resources for humans.
    1. Distribution of water on earth.
    2. The water cycle.
    3. Fresh water resources: distribution and allocation locally and globally
  5. Describe the structure of the solid earth and relate it to such phenomena as earthquakes, mountain ranges and volcanoes.
    1. Plate tectonics.
    2. Volcanism, earthquakes, orogenesis.
    3. Weathering: atmosphere/hydrosphere/lithosphere interaction.
  6. Discuss the potentials & limitations of scientific innovations to mitigate natural hazards.
    1. Cyclones and tornadoes
      1. satellite monitoring and prediction
      2. radar monitoring and prediction
    2. Earthquakes and volcanoes
      1. the uses of seismic monitoring
      2. GPS and remote sensing monitoring
      3. mitigation and zoning
    3. Tsunamis: early warning networks
  7. Evaluate the effects of the atmosphere and the hydrosphere on the lithosphere.
    1. Weathering: atmosphere/hydrosphere/lithosphere interaction.
    2. Physical and chemical weathering
    3. Eolian environments
    4. Glacial weathering and landforms
    5. The littoral zone
    6. Soil formation and classifications.
  8. Assess the activities by which humans have modified the natural landscape.
    1. Fresh water resources: distribution and allocation
    2. Ecosystems and biomes
    3. Human effects on the atmosphere:
      1. Ozone depletion
      2. Global warming
      3. Acid rain
  9. Relate climate patterns and soils to the Earth's ecosystems.
    1. Use the scientific method to predict green-up and senescence patterns based on climate and seasonal insolation patterns.
    2. Interpret graphs of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) for given biomes and relate them to graphs of insolation, temperature and rainfall.
    3. Relate soils to vegetation vigor through interpretation of maps and remotely sensed images.
5. Repeatability - Moved to header area.
 
6. Methods of Evaluation -
  1. One midterm exam.
  2. One comprehensive final exam.
  3. Laboratory projects covering areas 4A - 4I of expanded description of course content. Projects must include data analysis, interpretation and hypothesis formulation.
7. Representative Text(s) -
Christopherson, Robert. Geosystems: A Physical Geography. 8th ed. New York: MacMillian, 2012.
Goode, John Paul, et al, Ed. Goodes World Atlas. 22nd ed. Skokie, IL: Rand McNally, 2009.

8. Disciplines -
Geography
 
9. Method of Instruction -
  1. Lecture
  2. Discussion
  3. Cooperative learning exercises,
  4. Electronic discussions/chat
  5. Laboratory
 
10. Lab Content -
  1. The Scientific Method
    1. Hypothesis
    2. Theory
    3. Law
  2. Use of data collection tools
    1. Accuracy
    2. Precision
    3. Error
  3. Use tools, data collection techniques, models and theories of science most prevalent in relevant research laboratories such as
    1. GIS (Geographic Information Systems)
    2. Remote Sensing
    3. GPS (Global Positioning Systems)
    4. Paper maps
    5. Thermometers
    6. Hygrometers
    7. Anemometers
    8. Seismographs
  4. Collection of data
  5. Analysis and interpretation of data collected by students
  6. Analysis and interpretation of large datasets drawn from the material world
  7. Formulation and testing of hypothesis
  8. Written laboratory reports which interpret results and draw reasonable conclusions
  9. A minimum of one collaborative activity in which students must work effectively in small groups and teams
 
11. Honors Description - No longer used. Integrated into main description section.
 
12. Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Weekly reading assignments from the textbook and objective quizzes
  2. Comprehensive midterm and final examinations
  3. Written laboratory reports involving hypothesis formation, interpretation and analysis of data.
  4. Laboratory projects that involve individual data collection using tools relevant to the discipline.
  5. Written assessments that determine student's mastery of course learning outcomes (SLO's)
13. Need/Justification -
This course is a required core course for the A.S. degree in Geography.


Course status: Active
Last updated: 2014-03-21 19:54:16


Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines