Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines

Fine Arts and Communication Division
ART 45BBEGINNING CERAMICS POTTER'S WHEELFall 2012
3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory.4 Units

Total Quarter Learning Hours: 72 (Total of All Lecture, Lecture/Lab, and Lab hours X 12)
 
 Lecture Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 3 Lecture/Lab:
 Note: If Lab hours are specified, see item 10. Lab Content below.

Repeatability -
Statement: Not Repeatable.

Status -
 Course Status: ActiveGrading: Letter Grade with P/NP option
 Degree Status: ApplicableCredit Status: Credit
 Degree or Certificate Requirement: AA Degree,   Certificate of Achievement,   Foothill GE
 GE Status: Humanities

Articulation Office Information -
 Transferability: BothValidation: 1/12/09;12/2/09;12/13/10

1. Description -
An introduction to throwing on the potter's wheel, and its historical and contemporary significance. This class will introduce the process of wedging clay, centering a pot, pulling a wall, shaping processes, and trimming techniques to complete well balanced forms on the potter's wheel. In addition to gaining expertise in wheel-throwing, students will examine, discuss, critique and write about the techniques, tools, ceramic terminology and processes of historical and contemporary thrown clay vessels. Students will use ceramic vocabulary in verbal and written class critiques.
Prerequisite: None
Co-requisite: None
Advisory: This course is included in the Ceramic Construction family of activity courses.

2. Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate technical competency and understand the process in wheel throwing and trimming on the potter's wheel and clay materials
  2. Demonstrate competency and understand the process of glazing and various surface treatments.
  3. Use a variety of pottery ceramic tools and equipment skillfully
  4. Skillfully demonstrate all of the steps and the process of pottery
  5. Integrate diverse cultural, historical, and contemporary styles and iconography effectively when applying carving, slip, and glaze decoration and patterns
  6. Integrate diverse cultural, historical and contemporary clay forms as ideas for ceramic projects
  7. Discuss and be exposed to contemporary guest ceramic artist from various diverse cultural backgrounds
  8. Communicate, discuss, identify, critically think about and write about the personal and cultural differences in a class critique
  9. Discuss and write about the tools, processes and content of "great works" from diverse cultures, historical, and contemporary ceramic pottery
  10. Write a one-two page paper about a ceramic pottery ceramic vessel from a gallery art or museum
3. Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
Clay, potters wheel, ceramic extruder, slab roller, kilns, glaze materials, sculpting tools, banding wheels, spray booth.

4. Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
  1. Demonstrate technical competency and understand the process of throwing on the potters' wheel, and trimming a foot.
    1. Wedging clay
    2. Centering clay on the potter's wheel
    3. Throwing basic forms
      1. A cylinder
      2. A vase
      3. A bowl
    4. Trimming a foot of a pot
    5. Making knobs and handles.
  2. Demonstrate competency and understand the process of glazing and various surface treatments.
    1. Pouring, spraying, dipping, brushing
    2. Wax and latex resist
    3. High and low firing
    4. Raku and pit firing
    5. Under-glazes and slip painting
    6. Stain/oxide application
  3. Use a variety of pottery tools and equipment skillfully
    1. The different kinds of clay
      1. Stoneware clay
      2. Porcelain clay
      3. Raku and sculpture clays
    2. Clay pottery tools
      1. Loop and ribbon tools
      2. Wooden angle tools
      3. Metal, rubber, and wooden ribs
      4. Rubber-tipped shaping tools
      5. Needle tools
      6. Wire tools
      7. Sponges
    3. Trimming equipment
      1. giffin grip
      2. chuck
      3. trimming loop tools
    4. Spray booth
  4. Understand the limitations and challenge of the clay drying process
    1. Wet clay
    2. Leather hard
    3. Bone dry or greenware
    4. Bisque-fired
    5. Glazed-fired
  5. Integrate diverse cultural, historical, and contemporary styles and iconography effectively when applying carving, slip, and glaze decoration and patterns
    1. Greek or Roman decorative patterns
    2. Asian or Eastern decorative patterns
    3. African decorative patterns
    4. Mesoamerican decorative patterns
    5. Egyptian decorative patterns
    6. Native American decorative patterns
    7. American decorative patterns
    8. European decorative patterns
    9. Contemporary and abstract decorative patterns
    10. Contemporary decorative patterns from our culture
  6. Integrate diverse cultural and historical clay forms as ideas for ceramic projects
    1. Greek or roman vessel forms
    2. Asian or eastern vessel forms
    3. Mesoamerican vessel forms
    4. Contemporary vessel forms from our culture
    5. Egyptian decorative patterns
    6. Native American decorative patterns
    7. American decorative patterns
    8. European decorative patterns
  7. Discuss and be exposed to contemporary guest ceramic artist from various diverse cultural backgrounds
    1. Artist that use a variety of different slab construction
    2. Artist that use a variety of different coil construction
    3. Artist that use a variety of different surface treatments, slip painting and glaze applications
    4. Artist from diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds
    5. Artist that make ceramics that is abstract or uses new trends in ceramics arts
  8. Communicate, discuss, identify and write about the personal and cultural differences in a class critique
    1. Using ceramic terminology in the class critique
      1. Leather hard
      2. Bone-dry
      3. Bisqueware
      4. Stoneware
      5. Glaze
      6. Slip
      7. High-fire
      8. Kiln
      9. Molds
    2. Discussing the cultural and personal difference of work present in a critique
    3. Critically discussing construction issues during the process of creating the ceramic piece
  9. Discussing and writing about the tools, processes and content of "great works" from diverse cultures, historical, and contemporary pottery
    1. Lectures and discussions related to historical styles and techniques of classical ceramic vessels.
    2. Lectures and discussions related to contemporary styles, trends and techniques in pottery and vessel
    3. Lecture and discussion showing a brief overview of the history to the present of great works of ceramics from various cultures
    4. Lecture and discussion about the human relevance of pottery is to our early cultures. Slide lectures will looks at early archeological artifacts.
    5. Lecture and discussion about functional and non functional pottery
  10. Writing a one page paper about a ceramic sculpture or hand-build ceramic vessel from a gallery art or museum
    1. Writing and discussing the ceramic tools, stylized textured line applications, cultural decorations or applied patterns, surface treatment, glaze or slip treatment, ceramic form or shape, the cultural symbolism or content and the subject matter in the ceramic piece.
    2. Writing and discussing the personal point of view from examining the ceramic piece.
    3. Writing the éâ˛first impressioné⨠the student gets from viewing the piece
    4. Writing about the content of the ceramic piece
      1. Understanding the expressive meaning in a ceramic vessel
      2. The hidden metaphors, symbols and meaning in a ceramic vessel
      3. The artist intention in ceramic vessel
      4. The cultural meaning or symbolism in a ceramic vessel
5. Repeatability - Moved to header area.
 
6. Methods of Evaluation -
  1. The instructor's direct evaluation of each completed project in relation to the stated goals of the assignment.
  2. Evaluation will be by critique of works in progress and finished pieces using criteria of design and technique presented in class. All assigned projects will be graded by the instructor.
  3. Craftsmanship, attention to detail, and problem solving ability.
  4. On-time completion of the projects.
  5. Participation is class activities, discussions and demonstrations.
7. Representative Text(s) -
Chavarria, Joaquim, The Big Book of Ceramics, a Guide to History, Materials and Techniques of Hand-building, Throwing, Molding, Kiln-Firing, Glazing Pottery and Other Ceramic Objects, Watson-Guptill, 1994.
Cooper, Emanual, Contemporary Ceramics, Thames and Hudson, 2009.

8. Disciplines -
Art
 
9. Method of Instruction -
Lecture, Discussion, Laboratory, Demonstration.
 
10. Lab Content -
  1. Ceramic projects that focus on centering a pot skillfully
  2. Ceramic projects that focus on making a cylinder on the potter's wheel
  3. Ceramic projects that focus on making a vase on the potter's wheel
  4. Ceramic projects that deal with learning various ways to attach clay
  5. Ceramic projects that deal with creating a personal approach to a project
  6. Ceramic projects focused on varied ways to use diverse cultural symbols, iconography and pattern
  7. Ceramic projects focused on varied ways to create visual or actual texture.
  8. Ceramic projects that focus on using a variety of ways to apply slip and glaze with a brush, dipping and spraying.
  9. Ceramic projects that focus on the forms and volumes influenced by looking at forms from different cultures.
  10. Sketchbook notations, generating ideas and problem solving sketches, thumbnail sketches for ceramic shapes and vessel from diverse cultures, historical time periods, and contemporary ceramics.
  11. Research historic and contemporary ceramic forms through in-class video and text library.
 
11. Honors Description - No longer used. Integrated into main description section.
 
12. Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Weekly reading assignments from the selected contemporary ceramic magazines.
  2. Weekly reading assignments from the ceramic historical and contemporary textbook
  3. Writing a paper about a ceramic sculpture or hand-build ceramic vessel from an art gallery or museum
    1. Writing and discussing the ceramic tools, stylized textured line applications, cultural decorations or applied patterns, surface treatment, glaze or slip treatment, ceramic form or shape, the cultural symbolism or content and the subject matter in the ceramic piece.
    2. Writing and discussing the personal point of view from examining the ceramic piece.
    3. Writing the éâ˛first impressioné⨠the student gets from viewing the piece
    4. Writing about the content of the ceramic piece
      1. Understanding the expressive meaning in a ceramic vessel
      2. The hidden metaphors, symbols and meaning in a ceramic vessel
      3. The artist intention in ceramic vessel
      4. The cultural meaning or symbolism in a ceramic vessel
13. Need/Justification -
This course is a restricted support course for the AA degrees and Certificate of Achievements in General Art and Studio Arts.


Course status: Active
Last updated: 2013-06-25 14:51:03


Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines