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Effective: Summer 2015
PHYS 4BGENERAL PHYSICS (CALCULUS)6 Unit(s)

Prerequisites: Prerequisite: PHYS 4A.
Corequisites: Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1C.
Grade Type: Letter Grade, the student may select Pass/No Pass
Not Repeatable.
FHGE: Non-GE Transferable: CSU/UC
5 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (96 hours total per quarter)

Description -
Classical electricity and magnetism.

Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. Discuss basic electrostatics and electric potential, and solve related problems.
  2. Analyze resistance, capacitance, and DC circuits, computing associated quantities.
  3. Discuss magnetic fields and forces, and solve related problems.
  4. Explain electromagnetic induction and inductance, and solve related problems.
  5. Extrapolate their understanding of DC circuits and circuit elements to AC circuits.
  6. Explain electromagnetic waves.
  7. Assess the limitations of physical laws and make mathematical approximations in appropriate situations.
  8. Understand how physical laws are established and the role of scientific evidence as support.
Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
Physics laboratory with equipment for teaching introductory electricity and magnetism.

Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
The student will be able to:
  1. Discuss basic electrostatics and electric potential, and solve related problems.
    1. Concept of charge
    2. Conductors and insulators
    3. Concept of electric force
      1. Coulomb's Law
    4. Concept of electric field
      1. Electric field lines
      2. Electric field from a point charge and superposition principle
      3. Calculating the electric field from charge distributions
    5. Gauss's Law
      1. Electric flux
      2. Applications of Gauss's Law
    6. Concept of electric potential
      1. Equipotential surfaces
      2. Electric potential from a point charge and superposition principle
      3. Calculating the electric potential from charge distributions
      4. Electric potential energy
  2. Analyze resistance, capacitance, and DC circuits, computing associated quantities.
    1. Concept of resistance
      1. Current
      2. Resistivity
      3. Resistance
      4. Series and parallel configurations
      5. EMF
    2. Concept of capacitance
      1. Capacitors
      2. Capacitance
      3. Dielectrics
      4. Series and parallel configurations
      5. Energy stored
    3. Concepts involving DC circuits
      1. Kirchhoff's Rules
      2. Ammeters and voltmeters
      3. RC circuits
  3. Discuss magnetic fields and forces, and solve related problems.
    1. Concept of magnetism
      1. Permanent magnets
    2. Concept of magnetic fields
      1. Magnetic field lines
      2. Magnetic flux
      3. Magnetic field of moving charges and currents
    3. Concept of magnetic force
      1. Motion of charged particles in magnetic fields
      2. Force between current carrying wires
      3. Applications of charged particle motion in magnetic fields
    4. Concept of torque on a current loop
      1. DC motor
    5. Ampere's Law
      1. Applications of Ampere's Law
  4. Explain electromagnetic induction and inductance, and solve related problems.
    1. Concept of induction
      1. Faraday's Law
      2. Lenz's Law
    2. Concept of motional EMF
    3. Concept of inductance
      1. Inductors
      2. Energy stored
      3. Self-inductance
      4. Mutual inductance
    4. Concepts involving inductors in circuits
      1. RL circuits
      2. LC circuits
      3. LRC circuits
  5. Extrapolate their understanding of DC circuits and circuit elements to AC circuits.
    1. Concept of phasors
    2. Concept of reactance
    3. Concept of resonance
    4. Transformers
  6. Explain electromagnetic waves.
    1. Maxwell's equations
    2. Electromagnetic spectrum
  7. Assess the limitations of physical laws and make mathematical approximations in appropriate situations.
    1. Physical laws as ideal models
    2. Methods of approximation
  8. Understand how physical laws are established and the role of scientific evidence as support.
    1. Historical development of a sampling of physical laws
    2. Use of student-collected data in labs to confirm physical laws

TBA Hours:
The student is required to prepare for lecture and laboratory before class. The student is required to spend at least 2 hours per week in the PSME Center becoming familiar with the background and theory for the lecture and the procedure, techniques, and equipment for the weeks
laboratory experiment(s). This will include completing pre-laboratory assignment(s) and/or preparing their laboratory notebook. The student will have access to videos, applets, software and professional tutors as resources in the PSME Center.
Methods of Evaluation -
  1. Weekly problem sets
  2. Periodic midterm tests
  3. Laboratory performance
  4. Final examination
Representative Text(s) -
Young and Freedman, Sears and Zemansky's University Physics. 12th ed., Pearson Publishing, 2008.

Disciplines -
Physics
 
Method of Instruction -
Lecture, Discussion, Cooperative learning exercises, Electronic discussions/chat, Laboratory, Demonstration.
 
Lab Content -
  1. Lab Student Learning Outcomes
    1. compute the size of the random (statistical) errors in measured data.
    2. compute the size of the random (statistical) errors in the results of experiments based upon the errors in the measured data.
    3. identify the sources of error and their effect upon the results of laboratory experiments.
    4. use the available computer facilities to process laboratory data.
    5. perform experiments in small groups rather than as individuals.
    6. accept or reject a hypothesis based upon evaluation of data.
    7. prepare concise and cogent reports of laboratory experiments.
  2. Suggested Laboratory Experiments (Most experiments should rely upon data generated by student's measurements of physical phenomena.)
    1. Introduction to Measurement Uncertainty and Error Analysis
    2. Introduction to Electronics Lab Equipment
    3. Mapping Electric Fields via Equipotentials
    4. The Electric Field of a Dipole
    5. Ohm's Law and Circuits
    6. Measurement of the Time Constant in an RC Circuit
    7. Charge to Mass Ratio of an Electron
    8. Magnetic Field of a Solenoid
    9. Measurements of Inductance
    10. Resonance in a Driven RLC Circuit
    11. Construction of an Electric Motor
    12. Experimental Design
 
Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Homework Problems: Homework problems covering subject matter from text and related material ranging from 10 - 40 problems per week. Students will need to employ critical thinking in order to complete assignments.
  2. Lecture: Five hours per week of lecture covering subject matter from text and related material. Reading and study of the textbook, related materials and notes.
  3. Labs: Students will perform experiments and discuss their results in either the form of a written lab report or via oral examination. Reading and understanding the lab manual prior to class is essential to success.