Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines

Physical Sciences, Mathematics & Engineering Division
PHYS 2AGENERAL PHYSICSFall 2011
4 hours lecture, 1 hour lecture-laboratory, 2 hours laboratory.5 Units

Total Quarter Learning Hours: 84 (Total of All Lecture, Lecture/Lab, and Lab hours X 12)
 
 Lecture Hours: 4 Lab Hours: 2 Lecture/Lab: 1
 Note: If Lab hours are specified, see item 10. Lab Content below.

Repeatability -
Statement: Not Repeatable.

Status -
 Course Status: ActiveGrading: Letter Grade with P/NP option
 Degree Status: ApplicableCredit Status: Credit
 GE Status: Natural Sciences (w/laboratory)

Articulation Office Information -
 Transferability: BothValidation:

1. Description -
Lectures, demonstrations, and problems in mechanics; properties of matter.
Prerequisite: MATH 48C or higher placement on the placement test.
Co-requisite: None
Advisory: None

2. Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. Explain basic kinematics and solve related problems.
  2. Apply Newtonian Dynamics and the Three Laws of Motion.
  3. Explain work, energy and power and solve related problems.
  4. Derive momentum and impulse and apply these concepts to problems.
  5. Apply their understanding of mechanics to rotational cases.
  6. Apply their understanding of mechanics to the standard introductory topics of oscillators and universal gravity.
  7. Assess the limitations of physical laws and make mathematical approximations in appropriate situations.
  8. Discuss how physical laws are established and the role of scientific evidence as support.
3. Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
Physics laboratory with equipment for teaching introductory mechanics.

4. Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
The student will be able to:
  1. Explain basic kinematics and solve related problems
    1. concept of position
    2. concept of velocity
      1. average velocity
      2. instantaneous velocity
    3. concept of acceleration
      1. average acceleration
      2. instantaneous acceleration
    4. problems featuring constant acceleration
    5. falling body problems
    6. motion in two or three dimensions
      1. position, velocity and acceleartion as vectors
      2. projectile motion
      3. motion in a circle
  2. Apply Newtonian Dynamics and the Three Laws of Motion
    1. Concept of a force
    2. Newton's First Law
    3. Newton's Second Law
      1. The difference between mass and weight
      2. Free body diagrams
    4. Newton's Third Law
    5. Special forces
      1. The spring force
      2. Friction
      3. The Centripetal force
  3. Explain work, energy and power and solve related problems
    1. The definition of work
      1. Work in one dimension as a result of a constant force
      2. Work in one dimension as a result of a non-constant force
      3. Work when the displacement and force are not in one dimension
    2. Kinetic Energy
      1. Derivation from Newton's Second Law
      2. The work-energy theorem
    3. Power
    4. Potential Energy
      1. Derivation from work
      2. Gravitational potential energy
      3. Spring potential energy
      4. Conservation of Energy
        1. Conservative and nonconservative forces
        2. Conservation of energy-type problems with friction
  4. Derive momentum and impulse and apply these concepts to problems.
    1. Conservation of Momentum from Newton's Third Law
    2. Definition of impulse
    3. Elastic and inelastic collisons
    4. The center of mass
  5. Apply their understanding of mechanics to rotational cases.
    1. Defintions of angular position, velocity and acceleration
      1. Cases with constant angular acceleration
      2. Relationship between linear and angular motion
    2. Energy considerations in rotational motion
    3. The moment of inertia
      1. Moment of interia for collections of point particles
      2. Moments of inertia for extended bodies
      3. The parrallel axis theorem
    4. Torque
    5. Angular momentum
  6. Apply their understanding of mechanics to the standard introductory topics of oscillators and universal gravity
    1. Statics
      1. Equilibrium
      2. Center of gravity
    2. Oscillators
      1. Simple harmonic motion
        1. Spring and a mass
        2. Pendula
        3. Damped oscillators
        4. Forced oscillators
        5. Resonance
    3. Universal Gravitation
      1. Newton's Law of Gravitation
      2. Gravitational potential energy
      3. Kepler's Laws
        1. Historical development
        2. Motion of satellites
  7. Assess the limitations of physical laws and make mathematical approximations in appropriate situations
    1. Physical laws as ideal models
    2. Methods of approximation
  8. Discuss how physical laws are established and the role of scientific evidence as support
    1. Historical development of a sampling of physical laws
    2. Use of student-collected data in labs to confirm physical laws
5. Repeatability - Moved to header area.
 
6. Methods of Evaluation -
  1. Weekly assignments
  2. Mid-term test
  3. Laboratory
  4. Final examination
7. Representative Text(s) -
Walker, James S. Physics. 4th ed. Prentice Hall, 2008.

8. Disciplines -
Physics
 
9. Method of Instruction -
Lecture, Discussion, Cooperative learning exercises, Oral presentations, Laboratory, Demonstration.
 
10. Lab Content -
  1. Lab Student Learning Outcomes
    1. compute the size of the random (statistical) errors in measured data.
    2. compute the size of the random (statistical) errors in the results of experiments based upon the errors in the measured data.
    3. identify the sources of error and their effect upon the results of laboratory experiments.
    4. use the available computer facilities to process laboratory data.
    5. perform experiments in small groups rather than as individuals.
    6. accept or reject a hypothesis based upon evaluation of data.
    7. prepare concise and cogent reports of laboratory experiments.
  2. Suggested Laboratory Experiments (Most experiments should rely upon data generated by student's measurements of physical phenomena.)
    1. Measurements and experimental errors
    2. Gravitational acceleration
    3. Newton's Second Law of Motion
    4. Concurrent forces in equilibrium
    5. Uniform circular motion
    6. Conservation of energy
    7. Collisions and Conservation of Momentum
    8. Torque and Center of Mass
    9. Hooke's Law and Simple Harmonic Motion
    10. Archimedes' Principle
    11. Moment of Inertia of a Solid Disk and Ring
    12. Experimental Design
 
11. Honors Description - No longer used. Integrated into main description section.
 
12. Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Homework Problems: Homework problems covering subject matter from text and related material ranging from 10 - 40 problems per week. Students will need to employ critical thinking in order to complete assignments.
  2. Lecture: Four hours per week of lecture covering subject matter from text and related material. Reading and study of the textbook, related materials and notes.
  3. Labs: Students will perform experiments and discuss their results in either the form of a written lab report or via oral examination. Reading and understanding the lab manual prior to class is essential to success.
13. Need/Justification -
This course is a required core course for the AS degree in General Studies Science.


Course status: Active
Last updated: 2014-03-20 16:05:36


Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines