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Effective: Summer 2017
MUS 3BTHEORY & MUSICIANSHIP II5 Unit(s)

Advisory: Advisory: MUS 3A proficiency or equivalent.
Grade Type: Letter Grade, the student may select Pass/No Pass
Not Repeatable.
FHGE: Non-GE Transferable: CSU/UC
4 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. (84 hours total per quarter)

Student Learning Outcomes -
  • A successful student will identify binary and ternary forms in late 18th and early 19th century music.
  • A successful student will create modulations in diatonic harmony.
  • Training in hearing the different musical intervals.
Description -
Continuation of common practice procedures in music and their application to composition and music literature. Seventh chords, an introduction to two-part counterpoint, secondary dominants and leading tone chords, modulation, and voice-leading techniques in four-part chorale writing. Musicianship skills to include melodic dictation with leaps from the I, IV, and V7 chords, rhythmic dictation in both simple and compound meters, harmonic dictation of typical chord progressions including notation of outer voices and Roman numerals, and sight-singing melodies with leaps from the I, IV, and V7 chords.

Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. notate and identify all seventh chords including inversions.
  2. analyze harmonic progressions that use non-dominant seventh chords, secondary dominants, diatonic and modulating sequences, and modulation to closely related keys in binary and ternary forms.
  3. apply non-dominant seventh chords, secondary dominants, diatonic and modulating sequences and modulation to closely related keys by realizing a figured bass and by harmonizing a given melody.
  4. write a composition demonstrating these fundamentals.
  5. demonstrate musicianship skills:
    1. take dictation of melodies featuring leaps from the primary triads.
    2. take dictation of rhythms with subdivided beats in simple and compound meters.
    3. take harmonic dictation of basic diatonic progressions writing outer voices and Roman numerals.
    4. sight-read and perform rhythms with divided beats in simple and compound meters.
    5. sight-sing melodies featuring leaps from the primary triads and the V7 chord.
Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
  1. classroom with midi keyboards and/or pianos, staff-lined blackboards, stereo/CD player.
  2. when taught on campus: access to a cassette player; classroom sound equipment for compact discs, audiotape and records, screen, overhead projector, slide projector, VCR.
  3. when taught via Foothill Global Access: on-going access to computer with Email software and capabilities; Email address; Java-script enabled internet browsing software.

Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
  1. dominant sevenths and all non-dominant seventh chords.
  2. basic figured bass principles.
  3. introduction to modulation.
  4. non-harmonic tones.
  5. basic cadential formulas and phrase structure.
  6. introduction to two-part counterpoint.
  7. voice-leading in four-part chorale writing.
  8. introduction to secondary dominant and leading tone chords.
  9. musicianship skills:
    1. sight-singing of melodies featuring leaps from the primary triads.
    2. assignments with common melodic patterns (arpeggios, sequences, non-chord tones).
    3. assignments with basic chord progressions including inversions.
    4. basic phrase structure: the period (parallel and contrasting).
    5. melodic dictation featuring leaps from the primary triads and the V7 chord.
    6. two-part melodic dictation.
    7. harmonic dictation of basic diatonic progressions with inversions, including writing outer voices and Roman numerals.
    8. assignments with basic rhythms including subdivided beats in simple and compound meters.
    9. rhythmic dictation with subdivided beats in simple and compound meters.
Methods of Evaluation -
  1. Homework assignments based on textbook chapters.
  2. Written tests on notating all forms of cadential chordal structures.
  3. Aural tests on simple chord progressions.
  4. Comprehensive midterm and final examinations.
  5. Two graded final compositions.
  6. In-class sight-singing and dictation drills.
  7. Rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic dictation exercises and exams.
  8. Self-paced individual laboratory work.
Representative Text(s) -
Benward, Bruce and Gary White. Music in Theory and Practice. Vol. 1, 9th ed. McGraw-Hill Education, 2015.
Berkowitz, S. A New Approach to Sight-Singing. 5th ed. W.W. Norton, 2011.
Ethier, G. Ear Training and Sight-Singing. Oxford University Press, 2013.

When taught via Foothill Global Access: supplemental lectures, handouts, tests, and assignments delivered via Email; feedback on tests and assignments delivered via Email; class discussion may be delivered in chat rooms, list-serves, and newsgroups.

Disciplines -
Music
 
Method of Instruction -
During periods of instruction the student will be:
  1. listening and reading lecture information.
  2. completing written assignments and laboratory exercises demonstrating musicianship skills.
  3. receiving feedback on all assignments, exercises, and drills.
 
Lab Content -
Laboratory Exercises: Weekly lab exercises in the Theory/Piano Lab. Each lab exercise may be individual or consist of group activities developing musical skills such as sight-singing, ear training, and rhythmic and melodic dictation. Also supplement assigned reading and lecture topics.
 
Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Reading Assignments: Weekly reading assignments from text, online curriculum, lab manual, and outside sources ranging from 40 to 60 pages per week.
  2. Lecture: Weekly lecture covering subject matter from text assignment with extended topic information.
  3. Laboratory Exercises: Weekly lab exercises in the Network Lab. Each lab exercise may be individual or group activities and covers assigned reading and lecture topics.