Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines

Physical Sciences, Mathematics & Engineering Division
MATH 12CALCULUS FOR BUSINESS & ECONOMICSSummer 2014
5 hours lecture.5 Units

Total Quarter Learning Hours: 60 (Total of All Lecture, Lecture/Lab, and Lab hours X 12)
 
 Lecture Hours: 5 Lab Hours: Lecture/Lab:
 Note: If Lab hours are specified, see item 10. Lab Content below.

Repeatability -
Statement: Not Repeatable.

Status -
 Course Status: ActiveGrading: Letter Grade with P/NP option
 Degree Status: ApplicableCredit Status: Credit
 Degree or Certificate Requirement: AS Degree
 GE Status: Non-GE

Articulation Office Information -
 Transferability: BothValidation: 11/16/11; 11/27/12;10/13

1. Description -
A study of the techniques of differential and integral calculus, with an emphasis on the application of these techniques to problems in business and economics.
Prerequisite: MATH 48A.
Co-requisite: None
Advisory: Demonstrated proficiency in English by placement into ENGL 1A as determined by score on the English placement test or through an equivalent placement process.

2. Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. demonstrate an understanding of elementary functions
  2. demonstrate understanding of elementary ideas of limits, rates of change, and the derivative.
  3. apply techniques of differentiation, graphically numerically and symbolically
  4. use the derivative to solve problems in optimization, with particular emphasis on problems from business and economics.
  5. demonstrate understanding of elementary ideas of accumulated change and the definite integral.
  6. Solve applications problems using definite integrals
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of antidifferentiation techniques and be able to analyze antiderivatives graphically and numerically.
  8. Use technology such as graphing calculators and/or computer software to assist in solving problems involving any of the topics in (A) through (G) above
  9. discuss mathematical problems and write solutions in accurate mathematical language and notation.
  10. interpret mathematical solutions.
3. Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
  1. Graphing Calculator
  2. When taught hybrid: Four lecture hours per week in face-to-face contact and one hour per week using CCC Confer. Students need internet access.

4. Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of elementary functions
    1. Linear functions
    2. Average rate of change
    3. Exponential functions
    4. Logarithmic functions
    5. Exponential growth and decay
    6. Proportionality and power functions
  2. Demonstrate understanding of elementary ideas of limits, rates of change, and the derivative.
    1. Limits
      1. Approximation of limits numerically and visually from graphs of functions
      2. Limits and continuity
      3. Computation of limits algebraically
    2. Instantaneous rate of change and tangent lines
    3. The derivative function
    4. Interpretations of the derivative
    5. The second derivative
    6. Marginal cost, profit, and revenue
  3. Apply techniques of differentiation, graphically numerically and symbolically
    1. Derivative formulas for powers and polynomials.
    2. Exponential and logarithmic functions
    3. The chain rule
    4. The sum, product, and quotient rules
    5. Implicit differentiation
    6. Sketching graphs of functions using horizontal/vertical asymptotes, intercepts, and the first and second derivatives to determine intervals where the function is increasing/decreasing, is concave up/down, and has local extrema and points of inflection
  4. Use the derivative to solve problems in optimization, with particular emphasis on problems from business and economics.
    1. Local maxima and minima
    2. Inflection points
    3. Global maxima and minima
    4. Profit cost and revenue
    5. Average cost
    6. Elasticity of demand
    7. Logistic growth
  5. Demonstrate understanding of elementary ideas of accumulated change and the definite integral.
    1. The definite integral
    2. The definite integral as area
    3. Interpretations of the definite integral
    4. The fundamental theorem of calculus
    5. Approximate definite integrals using Riemann sums
  6. Solve applications problems using definite integrals
    1. Average value
    2. Consumer and producer surplus
    3. Present and future value
    4. Areas between curves: computation of with definite integrals and in applications (e.g., total profit)
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of antidifferentiation techniques and be able to analyze antiderivatives graphically and numerically.
    1. Constructing antiderivatives analytically
    2. Integration by substitution
    3. Using the fundamental theorem to find definite integrals
    4. Integration by parts
    5. Analyze antiderivatives graphically and numerically
  8. Use technology such as graphing calculators and/or computer software to assist in solving problems involving any of the topics in (A) through (G) above.
    1. Calculator/computer utilities for approximating graphs of derivative functions.
    2. Calculator/computer utilities for evaluating definite integrals
    3. Calculator/computer utilities for approximating graphs of antiderivative functions
  9. Discuss mathematical problems and write solutions in accurate mathematical language and notation.
    1. Use of proper notation
  10. Interpret mathematical solutions.
    1. Explain significance of solutions to application problems.
5. Repeatability - Moved to header area.
 
6. Methods of Evaluation -
  1. Homework
  2. Quizzes
  3. Exams
  4. Proctored comprehensive final examination
7. Representative Text(s) -
Hughes-Hallett, Deborah, Andrew Gleason, and Patti Frazer Lock, et al. Applied Calculus. 4th ed. New York, NY: John Wiley & Son, Inc., 2010.

8. Disciplines -
Mathematics
 
9. Method of Instruction -
  1. Lecture
  2. Discussion
  3. Cooperative learning exercises
 
10. Lab Content -
Not applicable.
 
11. Honors Description - No longer used. Integrated into main description section.
 
12. Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Homework Problems: Homework problems covering subject matter from text and related material ranging from 30 - 60 problems per week. Students will need to employ critical thinking in order to complete assignments.
  2. Reading and study of the textbook, related materials and notes.
  3. Projects: Student projects covering subject matter from textbook and related materials. Projects will require students to discuss mathematical problems,write solutions in accurate mathematical language and notation and interpret mathematical solutions. Projects may require the use of a computer algebra system such as Mathematica or MATLAB.
  4. Worksheets: Problems and activities covering the subject matter.
Such problems and activities will require students to think critically. Such worksheets may be completed both inside and/or outside of class.
13. Need/Justification -
This course is a required core course for the A.S. degree in General Studies Science.


Course status: Active
Last updated: 2014-03-21 20:24:46


Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines