Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines

Physical Sciences, Mathematics & Engineering Division
MATH 11FINITE MATHEMATICSFall 2011
5 hours lecture.5 Units

Total Quarter Learning Hours: 60 (Total of All Lecture, Lecture/Lab, and Lab hours X 12)
 
 Lecture Hours: 5 Lab Hours: Lecture/Lab:
 Note: If Lab hours are specified, see item 10. Lab Content below.

Repeatability -
Statement: Not Repeatable.

Status -
 Course Status: ActiveGrading: Letter Grade with P/NP option
 Degree Status: ApplicableCredit Status: Credit
 GE Status: Communication & Analytical Thinking

Articulation Office Information -
 Transferability: BothValidation:

1. Description -
Set theory, basic combinatorial analysis, introduction to probability, linear equations and inequalities, introduction to linear programming and the simplex method, introduction to matrix algebra with applications, Markov chains, game theory and mathematics of finance.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the placement test or MATH 105 or 108.
Co-requisite: None
Advisory: Demonstrated proficiency in English by placement into ENGL 1A as determined by score on the English placement test or through an equivalent placement process.

2. Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. Determine the equation of a line, graph linear equations, and solve applications problems in business, science, and social science using linear models.
  2. Solve systems of linear equations graphically, using algebraic methods, and with matrices; solve applications problems in business, science, and social science using these methods.
  3. Understand matrix arithmetic and matrix algebra, and use it to solve applications problems in business, science, and social science.
  4. Model linear programming problems by constructing an appropriate linear program, and solve linear programming problems using both graphical methods and the simplex algorithm.
  5. Compute compound and simple interest, future and present value of an annuity and payments on a loan, and use the equations of finance to solve applications problems.
  6. Solve problems using sets and basic counting principles.
  7. Compute probabilities, including conditional probability, probability of independent events, using Baye's formula, and for binomial experiments.
  8. Solve problems using Markov Chains.
  9. Solve problems in game theory.
  10. Discuss mathematical problems and write solutions in accurate mathematical language and notation.
  11. Interpret mathematical solutions.
3. Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
  1. Graphing Calculator
  2. When taught hybrid: Four lecture hours per week in face-to-face contact and one hour per week using CCC Confer. Students need internet access.

4. Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
  1. Determine the equation of a line, graph linear equations, and solve applications problems in business, science, and social science using linear models.
    1. Coordinate systems and graphs
    2. Slopes and equations of straight lines
    3. Linear modeling with one line
  2. Solve systems of linear equations graphically, using algebraic methods, and with matrices; solve applications problems in business, science, and social science using these methods.
    1. Graphing method
    2. The substitution method
    3. The elimination method
    4. Gauss-Jordan reduction
  3. Understand matrix arithmetic and matrix algebra, and use it to solve applications problems in business, science, and social science.
    1. Matrix addition
    2. Matrix multiplication
    3. Matrix algebra
    4. Inverse of a matrix
  4. Model linear programming problems by constructing an appropriate linear program, and solve linear programming problems using both graphical methods and the simplex algorithm.
    1. Linear inequalities in two variables
    2. The linear program for a linear programming problem
    3. Graphical methods
    4. The Simplex Algorithm
    5. Nonstandard and minimization problems
    6. Duality
    7. Applications to business, science, and social science
  5. Compute compound and simple interest, future and present value of an annuity, and payments on a loan; use the equations of finance to solve applications problems.
    1. Interest‚ƒīsimple and compound
    2. Annuities
    3. Amortization of loans
    4. Applications involving the equations of finance
  6. Solve problems using sets and basic counting principles.
    1. Sets and Venn diagrams
    2. The multiplication principle
    3. Permutations and combinations
    4. Application problems using sets and basic counting principles
  7. Compute probabilities, including conditional probability, of independent events, using Baye's formula, and for binomial experiments.
    1. Sample spaces
    2. Calculating probabilities of events
    3. Discrete random variables and expected value
    4. Conditional probability and independence
    5. Baye's theorem
    6. Binomial experiments
  8. Solve problems using Markov Chains.
    1. Transition matrix
    2. State vectors
    3. Regular Markov chains
    4. Application problems using Markov chains
  9. Solve problems in game theory.
    1. Games and strategies
    2. Mixed strategies
  10. Discuss mathematical problems and write solutions in accurate mathematical language and notation.
    1. Application problems from business, economics, social science, and science
    2. Proper notation
  11. Interpret mathematical solutions.
    1. Explain the significance of solutions to application problems.
5. Repeatability - Moved to header area.
 
6. Methods of Evaluation -
  1. Written homework
  2. Quizzes and tests
  3. Proctored comprehensive final examination
7. Representative Text(s) -
Young P, Lee T., Long P., and Graening, J. Finite Mathematics: An Applied Approach. 3rd ed. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., 2004.

8. Disciplines -
Mathematics
 
9. Method of Instruction -
Lecture, Discussion, Cooperative learning exercises.
 
10. Lab Content -
Not applicable.
 
11. Honors Description - No longer used. Integrated into main description section.
 
12. Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Homework Problems: Homework problems covering subject matter from text and related material ranging from 30 - 60 problems per week.
Students will need to employ critical thinking in order to complete assignments.
  • Lecture: Five hours per week of lecture covering subject matter from text and related material. Reading and study of the textbook, related materials and notes.
  • Projects: Student projects covering subject matter from textbook and related materials. Projects will require students to discuss mathematical problems,write solutions in accurate mathematical language and notation and interpret mathematical solutions. Projects may require the use of a computer algebra system such as Mathematica or MATLAB.
  • Worksheets: Problems and activities covering the subject matter.
  • Such problems and activities will require students to think critically. Such worksheets may be completed both inside and/or outside of class.
    13. Need/Justification -
    This course is a required core course for the AS degree in General Studies Science.


    Course status: Active
    Last updated: 2014-03-21 20:24:25


    Foothill CollegeApproved Course Outlines