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Effective: Spring 2011
GEOG 2HUMAN GEOGRAPHY4 Unit(s)

Advisory: Advisory: Demonstrated proficiency in English by placement as determined by score on the English placement test OR through an equivalent placement process OR completion of ESLL 25 & ESLL 249.
Grade Type: Letter Grade, the student may select Pass/No Pass
Not Repeatable.
FHGE: Social & Behavioral Sciences Transferable: CSU/UC
4 hours lecture. (48 hours total per quarter)

Student Learning Outcomes -
  • Use maps, graphs and/or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to analyze and interpret data and draw valid conclusions
  • Place contemporary developments in cultural, historical, environmental and spatial context.
  • Analyze relationships between humans and the natural world in which they live.
  • Discuss patterns of population growth and change around the world.
Description -
The cultural geographic landscape. Study of the human population from origins to the present with an emphasis on the future. Examination of population densities, migrations and settlements; races, languages and religions; patterns of land use and major environmental perceptions and problems. Analysis of energy, mineral, and food resources and how cultures utilize them.

Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. Use maps, graphs, and/or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to analyze and interpret data, and draw valid conclusions.
  2. Examine contemporary developments in a cultural, historical, environmental and spatial context.
  3. Analyze relationships between humans and the natural world in which they live.
  4. Discuss patterns of culture and population growth and change around the world.
Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
When taught as an online distance learning section, students and faculty need ongoing and continuous Internet and Email access.

Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
  1. Use maps, graphs, and/or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to analyze and interpret data, and draw valid conclusions.
    1. Utilize and explain the methodology through which Geographers examine the world.
    2. Discuss the importance of place
    3. Explain the interdependence of Geographic Scales
  2. Examine contemporary developments in a cultural, historical, environmental and spatial context.
    1. Describe the field of Geography
    2. Examine the effects of globalization
    3. Discuss current events in their geographic context
  3. Analyze relationships between humans and the natural world in which they live.
    1. Evaluate the Geography of economic development
    2. Discuss agriculture and food production
    3. Analyze transportation, communication and trade networks
    4. Explain the relationship between nations and states
    5. Classify urban Geographies
    6. Describe the natural world
      1. Fundamentals of climate.
      2. Fundamentals of landforms.
      3. Patterns of vegetation.
      4. Soil and water distributions.
    7. Discuss human habitat regions.
      1. Dry environments
      2. Temperate regions
      3. Cold regions
      4. Mountainous regions
  4. Discuss patterns of culture and population growth and change around the world.
    1. Define culture
    2. Examine global and local patterns of culture
    3. Evaluate culture and population change in terms of major geographic concepts including diffusion, sequent occupance and regional complementarity
    4. Explain globalization and cultural change
    5. Describe global population distribution
    6. Discuss birth rates and death rates
    7. Define demographic transition theory
    8. Discuss migration
Methods of Evaluation -
  1. Quizzes.
  2. Papers and projects involving critical thinking and analytical oral and/or written skills including consideration of events and ideas from multiple perspectives.
  3. Midterm(s) examinations and a comprehensive final examination.
Representative Text(s) -
Fellmann, J.D, A. Getis, and J. Getis. Human Geography, 11th ed. New York, New York: McGraw Hill, 2010.

Disciplines -
Geography
 
Method of Instruction -
Lecture, Discussion, Cooperative learning exercises, Oral presentations.
 
Lab Content -
Not applicable.
 
Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Read assigned chapters in the text and answer end of chapter questions
  2. Papers and projects involving critical thinking and analytical oral and/or written skills including consideration of events and ideas from multiple perspectives utilizing tools relevant to the discipline such as maps and Geographic Information Systems (GIS)