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Effective: Summer 2017
GEOG 2HUMAN GEOGRAPHY4 Unit(s)

Advisory: Advisory: Demonstrated proficiency in English by placement as determined by score on the English placement test OR through an equivalent placement process OR completion of ESLL 125 & ESLL 249.
Grade Type: Letter Grade, the student may select Pass/No Pass
Not Repeatable.
FHGE: Social & Behavioral Sciences Transferable: CSU/UC
4 hours lecture. (48 hours total per quarter)

Student Learning Outcomes -
  • Use maps, graphs and/or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to analyze and interpret data and draw valid conclusions
  • Place contemporary developments in cultural, historical, environmental and spatial context.
  • Analyze relationships between humans and the natural world in which they live.
  • Discuss patterns of population growth and change around the world.
Description -
The cultural geographic landscape. Study of the human population from origins to the present with an emphasis on the future. Examination of population densities, migrations and settlements; races, languages and religions; patterns of land use and major environmental perceptions and problems. Analysis of energy, mineral, and food resources and how cultures utilize them.

Course Objectives -
The student will be able to:
  1. Understand basic geographic concepts and spatial analysis
  2. Examine the development and components of globalization within a spatial context
  3. Describe historical and contemporary population patterns and distribution
  4. Discuss historical and contemporary human-environment interactions and philosophies
  5. Discuss material and symbolic forms and development of culture including language, religion and identity differences
  6. Analyze and interpret landscapes and place
  7. Describe the development and impact of food systems and agriculture
  8. Apply geographic concepts to political and economic processes
  9. Describe the structure and development of urban spaces
Special Facilities and/or Equipment -
When taught as an online distance learning section, students and faculty need ongoing and continuous Internet and Email access.

Course Content (Body of knowledge) -
  1. Understand basic geographic concepts and spatial analysis
    1. Reading and interpreting maps and graphs
    2. Describe the field of Geography
    3. Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
    4. Diffusion, distance, spatial interaction, and accessibility
    5. Scale, boundaries, and borders
    6. Interdependence
    7. Quantitative and qualitative methodologies
  2. Examine the development and components of globalization within a spatial context
    1. Geography of the pre-modern world to the contemporary world
    2. Transportation and communication
    3. Core, periphery, and semi-periphery
    4. Interdependence
    5. Nationalism and resistance
    6. Contemporary issues
  3. Describe historical and contemporary population patterns and distribution
    1. Demography and the Census
    2. Population distribution and composition
    3. Population density, birth rates, death rates
    4. Age-sex pyramids
    5. Population Transition Theory
    6. Patterns and forms of migration
    7. Push factors and pull factors
    8. Population debates
  4. Discuss historical and contemporary human-environment interactions and philosophies
    1. Identify human-environment interactions
    2. Conceptions of nature and society
    3. Environmental philosophies
    4. Use of natural resources
    5. Conservation, preservation and sustainable resource use
    6. Global climate change
    7. Environmental policies and debates
  5. Discuss material and symbolic forms and development of culture including language, religion and identity differences
    1. Definitions of culture as material and symbolic
    2. Historical and contemporary approaches to studying culture
    3. Cultural systems of language and religion
    4. Patterns of religion and influences on culture
    5. Cultural regions
    6. Geographies of difference: race, class, gender, sexuality, and other identities
    7. The mutual construction of place and identity
  6. Analyze and interpret landscapes and place
    1. Conceptions of landscape, place, and location
    2. Historical and contemporary approaches to studying landscape
    3. Place-making and territoriality
    4. Landscape and place as dynamic
    5. Landscapes of power and resistance
  7. Describe the development and impact of food systems and agriculture
    1. Traditional forms of agriculture
    2. Industrialization and agricultural revolutions
    3. Green revolution and GMOs
    4. Globalization and agriculture
    5. Agribusiness and industrial food systems
    6. Environmental impacts
    7. Changing food regimes
    8. Food and health
  8. Apply geographic concepts to political and economic processes
    1. Nations and states
    2. Political boundaries and borders
    3. Colonialism and imperialism
    4. Global governance and organizations
    5. Global and regional economic structure
    6. Global and regional division of labor
    7. Trade policies and practices
    8. Global and regional economic development
  9. Describe the structure and development of urban spaces
    1. Spatial structure of the urban form
    2. Planned and unplanned urbanization
    3. Enclaves, congregation, and segregation
    4. Urban decay and deindustrialization
    5. Gentrification
    6. Conceptions of city spaces
Methods of Evaluation -
  1. Quizzes.
  2. Papers and projects involving critical thinking and analytical oral and/or written skills including consideration of events and ideas from multiple perspectives.
  3. Midterm(s) examinations and a comprehensive final examination.
Representative Text(s) -
Knox, P. and S. Marston. Human Geography: Places and Regions in Global Context. 7th ed. Harlow: Pearson, 2016.

Disciplines -
Geography
 
Method of Instruction -
Lecture, Discussion, Cooperative learning exercises, Oral presentations.
 
Lab Content -
Not applicable.
 
Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing and Outside of Class Assignments -
  1. Read assigned chapters in the text and answer end of chapter questions
  2. Papers and projects involving critical thinking and analytical oral and/or written skills including consideration of events and ideas from multiple perspectives utilizing tools relevant to the discipline such as maps and Geographic Information Systems (GIS)